Parenting style during childhood is associated with the development of chronic pain and a patient's need for psychosomatic treatment in adulthood: A case-control study

Mao Shibata, Toshiharu Ninomiya, Kozo Anno, Hiroshi Kawata, Rie Iwaki, Ryoko Sawamoto, Chiharu Kubo, Yutaka Kiyohara, Nobuyuki Sudo, Masako Hosoi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between parenting style and chronic pain and the patients' need for psychosomatic treatment in adulthood.We compared 4 combinations of 2 parenting style subscales, high and low care and overprotection, among the following 4 age- and sex-matched groups: community-dwelling subjects without chronic pain (n = 100), community-dwelling subjects with chronic pain (n = 100), outpatients with chronic pain (n = 50), and inpatients with chronic pain (n = 50). Parenting style was assessed for both the mother and father by use of the Parental Bonding Instrument questionnaire. The parenting style associated with the worst outcome was defined as both low care and high overprotection, as reported in previous studies.The frequency of reported adverse parenting style was significantly higher among chronic pain patients than community-dwelling subjects without chronic pain (all P < .05). The odds ratios for an adverse parenting style significantly increased through the categories after adjusting for demographic factors and the pain visual analog scale (P for trend <.01).These findings suggest that parental low care and high overprotection during childhood contribute to the future risk of chronic pain and the patients' need for psychosomatic treatment in adulthood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e21230
JournalMedicine
Volume99
Issue number29
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 17 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Parenting style during childhood is associated with the development of chronic pain and a patient's need for psychosomatic treatment in adulthood: A case-control study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this