Passive immunization with milk produced from an immunized cow prevents oral recolonization by Streptococcus mutans

Y. Shimazaki, M. Mitoma, T. Oho, Y. Nakano, Yoshihisa Yamashita, K. Okano, Yutaka Nakano, M. Fukuyama, N. Fujihara, Y. Nada, T. Koga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cell surface protein antigen (PAc) and water-insoluble glucan-synthesizing enzyme (GTF-1) produced by cariogenic Streptococcus mutans are two major factors implicated in the colonization of the human oral cavity by this bacterium. We examined the effect of bovine milk, produced after immunization with a fusion protein of functional domains of these proteins, on the recolonization of S. mutans. To prepare immune milk, a pregnant Holstein cow was immunized with the fusion protein PAcA-GB, a fusion of the saliva-binding alanine-rich region (PAcA) of PAc and the glucan-binding (GB) domain of GTF-I. After eight adult subjects received cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) treatment, one subgroup (n = 4) rinsed their mouths with immune milk and a control group (n = 4) rinsed with nonimmune milk. S. mutans levels in saliva and dental plaque decreased after CPC treatment in both groups. Mouth rinsing with immune milk significantly inhibited recolonization of S. mutans in saliva and plaque. On the other hand, the numbers of S. mutans cells in saliva and plaque in the control group increased immediately after the CPC treatment and surpassed the baseline level 42 and 28 days, respectively, after the CPC treatment. The ratios of S. mutans to total streptococci in saliva and plaque in the group that received immune milk were lower than those in the control group. These results suggest that milk produced from immunized cow may be useful for controlling S. mutans in the human oral cavity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1136-1139
Number of pages4
JournalClinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 17 2001

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Immunization
Passive Immunization
Streptococcus mutans
Cetylpyridinium
Milk
Saliva
Mouth
Fusion reactions
Glucans
Control Groups
Dental Plaque
Therapeutics
Surface Antigens
Streptococcus
Alanine
Bacteria
Membrane Proteins
Proteins
Antigens
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Passive immunization with milk produced from an immunized cow prevents oral recolonization by Streptococcus mutans. / Shimazaki, Y.; Mitoma, M.; Oho, T.; Nakano, Y.; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Okano, K.; Nakano, Yutaka; Fukuyama, M.; Fujihara, N.; Nada, Y.; Koga, T.

In: Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology, Vol. 8, No. 6, 17.11.2001, p. 1136-1139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shimazaki, Y. ; Mitoma, M. ; Oho, T. ; Nakano, Y. ; Yamashita, Yoshihisa ; Okano, K. ; Nakano, Yutaka ; Fukuyama, M. ; Fujihara, N. ; Nada, Y. ; Koga, T. / Passive immunization with milk produced from an immunized cow prevents oral recolonization by Streptococcus mutans. In: Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology. 2001 ; Vol. 8, No. 6. pp. 1136-1139.
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AU - Nakano, Yutaka

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