Patients with intractable epilepsy who achieved good seizure control after craniotomy instead of vagal nerve stimulation

Takato Morioka, Takafumi Shimogawa, Tetsuro Sayama, Kimiaki Hashiguchi, Nobuya Murakami, Hiroshi Shigeto, Satoshi Suzuki, Ayumi Sakata, Kosuke Makihara, Koji Iihara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) is an effective adjunctive therapy for medically intractable epilepsy. However, VNS is a palliative therapy, and craniotomy should preferably be performed when complete seizure remission can be expected after craniotomy. We report here three patients who were referred for VNS therapy, but underwent craniotomy instead of VNS based on the results of a comprehensive preoperative evaluation, and achieved good seizure control. Case 1 was a 48-year-old woman with left temporal lobe epilepsy and amygdalar enlargement. Even though no left hippocampal sclerosis was observed on magnetic resonance imaging, she underwent left anterior temporal lobectomy and hippocampectomy. Case 2 was a 36-year-old woman with multiple bilateral subependymal nodular heterotopias, who underwent resection of the left medial temporal lobe including subependymal nodular heterotopias adjacent to the left inferior horn. Case 3 was a 25-year-old man with posttraumatic epilepsy. As the right hemisphere was most affected, multiple subpial transections were performed on the left frontal convexity. These three patients were referred to us for VNS therapy because there was a dissociation between the interictal electroencephalogram and magnetic resonance imaging findings, or because they had multiple or extensive epileptogenic lesions. Comprehensive preoperative evaluation including ictal electroencephalography can help to identify patients who are suitable candidates for craniotomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1137-1146
Number of pages10
JournalNeurological Surgery
Volume42
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

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Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Craniotomy
Seizures
Electroencephalography
Anterior Temporal Lobectomy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
Sclerosis
Temporal Lobe
Horns
Palliative Care
Epilepsy
Therapeutics
Stroke
Drug Resistant Epilepsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Patients with intractable epilepsy who achieved good seizure control after craniotomy instead of vagal nerve stimulation. / Morioka, Takato; Shimogawa, Takafumi; Sayama, Tetsuro; Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Murakami, Nobuya; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Sakata, Ayumi; Makihara, Kosuke; Iihara, Koji.

In: Neurological Surgery, Vol. 42, No. 12, 01.01.2014, p. 1137-1146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morioka, Takato ; Shimogawa, Takafumi ; Sayama, Tetsuro ; Hashiguchi, Kimiaki ; Murakami, Nobuya ; Shigeto, Hiroshi ; Suzuki, Satoshi ; Sakata, Ayumi ; Makihara, Kosuke ; Iihara, Koji. / Patients with intractable epilepsy who achieved good seizure control after craniotomy instead of vagal nerve stimulation. In: Neurological Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 42, No. 12. pp. 1137-1146.
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