Perceived duration of plaid motion increases with pattern speed rather than component speed

Kentaro Yamamoto, Kayo Miura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several studies have shown that visual motion distorts perceived duration: The duration of fast-moving stimuli is judged to be longer than the same duration of stationary or slow-moving stimuli. However, it is still unclear which stages of motion processing are involved in this apparent dilation of the perceived duration. In this study, using a two-dimensional pattern motion of a plaid as a stimulus, we systematically manipulated the speed of pattern and component motions of the plaid to examine which motion information influences the perceived duration of the plaid stimuli. Experiment 1 found that perceived duration increased with pattern speed, even though component speed was constant. Experiments 2 and 3 revealed that perceived duration was unchanged, even though component speed increased, as long as the pattern speed was identical. Experiment 4 used both static and moving plaids and confirmed that the results of Experiments 1-3 reflected duration dilation, not duration compression, induced by motion. These results suggest that higher order visual processing in the middle temporal area may play an important role in motion-induced duration dilation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Vision
Volume12
Issue number4:1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Dilatation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Perceived duration of plaid motion increases with pattern speed rather than component speed. / Yamamoto, Kentaro; Miura, Kayo.

In: Journal of Vision, Vol. 12, No. 4:1, 2012, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{502d168720c14e7b83302aadbf9161ff,
title = "Perceived duration of plaid motion increases with pattern speed rather than component speed",
abstract = "Several studies have shown that visual motion distorts perceived duration: The duration of fast-moving stimuli is judged to be longer than the same duration of stationary or slow-moving stimuli. However, it is still unclear which stages of motion processing are involved in this apparent dilation of the perceived duration. In this study, using a two-dimensional pattern motion of a plaid as a stimulus, we systematically manipulated the speed of pattern and component motions of the plaid to examine which motion information influences the perceived duration of the plaid stimuli. Experiment 1 found that perceived duration increased with pattern speed, even though component speed was constant. Experiments 2 and 3 revealed that perceived duration was unchanged, even though component speed increased, as long as the pattern speed was identical. Experiment 4 used both static and moving plaids and confirmed that the results of Experiments 1-3 reflected duration dilation, not duration compression, induced by motion. These results suggest that higher order visual processing in the middle temporal area may play an important role in motion-induced duration dilation.",
author = "Kentaro Yamamoto and Kayo Miura",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1167/12.4.1",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "1--13",
journal = "Journal of Vision",
issn = "1534-7362",
publisher = "Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Inc.",
number = "4:1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perceived duration of plaid motion increases with pattern speed rather than component speed

AU - Yamamoto, Kentaro

AU - Miura, Kayo

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Several studies have shown that visual motion distorts perceived duration: The duration of fast-moving stimuli is judged to be longer than the same duration of stationary or slow-moving stimuli. However, it is still unclear which stages of motion processing are involved in this apparent dilation of the perceived duration. In this study, using a two-dimensional pattern motion of a plaid as a stimulus, we systematically manipulated the speed of pattern and component motions of the plaid to examine which motion information influences the perceived duration of the plaid stimuli. Experiment 1 found that perceived duration increased with pattern speed, even though component speed was constant. Experiments 2 and 3 revealed that perceived duration was unchanged, even though component speed increased, as long as the pattern speed was identical. Experiment 4 used both static and moving plaids and confirmed that the results of Experiments 1-3 reflected duration dilation, not duration compression, induced by motion. These results suggest that higher order visual processing in the middle temporal area may play an important role in motion-induced duration dilation.

AB - Several studies have shown that visual motion distorts perceived duration: The duration of fast-moving stimuli is judged to be longer than the same duration of stationary or slow-moving stimuli. However, it is still unclear which stages of motion processing are involved in this apparent dilation of the perceived duration. In this study, using a two-dimensional pattern motion of a plaid as a stimulus, we systematically manipulated the speed of pattern and component motions of the plaid to examine which motion information influences the perceived duration of the plaid stimuli. Experiment 1 found that perceived duration increased with pattern speed, even though component speed was constant. Experiments 2 and 3 revealed that perceived duration was unchanged, even though component speed increased, as long as the pattern speed was identical. Experiment 4 used both static and moving plaids and confirmed that the results of Experiments 1-3 reflected duration dilation, not duration compression, induced by motion. These results suggest that higher order visual processing in the middle temporal area may play an important role in motion-induced duration dilation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861153480&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861153480&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1167/12.4.1

DO - 10.1167/12.4.1

M3 - Article

C2 - 22469816

AN - SCOPUS:84861153480

VL - 12

SP - 1

EP - 13

JO - Journal of Vision

JF - Journal of Vision

SN - 1534-7362

IS - 4:1

ER -