Physicians’ and pharmacists’ information provision and patients’ psychological distress

Hiroko Takaki, Takeru Abe, Akihito Hagihara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Providing information related to medication has many benefits for patients. However, patients’ conflicting perceptions about medical information provided by physicians and pharmacists may be associated with their psychological distress regarding treatment and medication. This study investigated associations between patients’ perceptions of agreement between physicians and pharmacists about medical information and improvements in their psychological distress. It also clarified the specific relationships of their perceptions with psychological distress. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Japanese community pharmacy settings. Pharmacists approached 1,500 patients visiting community pharmacies and provided them with questionnaire packages. Patients completed the questionnaires at home and returned them to the researchers by mail. Multivariate logistic regression analysis and signal detection analysis were conducted to examine associations of patients’ perceptions of information agreement with improvement in psychological distress. Measures of improvement in worry and anxiety about disease, improvement in worry and anxiety about medication, and improvement in depressive mood were used to assess alleviation of psychological distress. A total of 645 patients returned the questionnaires; 628 contributed to the data. Multivariate logistic regression analyses clarified that patients’ perceptions of agreement in information regarding need for medication, methods for adverse drug reaction reduction, adverse drug reaction symptoms, coping with forgetting to take medication, and advice for daily life were significantly associated with improvements in psychological distress. Furthermore, signal detection analysis showed that several combinations of patients’ perceptions of agreement between physicians and pharmacists about specific medical information were also significantly associated with improvement in psychological distress. Consistent information provision by physicians and pharmacists could contribute to decreased psychological distress in patients, and consequently to adherence to treatment and taking medication.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)575-582
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Interprofessional Care
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 3 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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