Polymer-binding peptides for the noncovalent modification of polymer surfaces: Effects of peptide density on the subsequent immobilization of functional proteins

Takaaki Date, Jun Sekine, Hisao Matsuno, Takeshi Serizawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Peptides that specifically bind to polyetherimide (PEI) were selected, characterized, and used for the noncovalent modification of the PEI surface. The peptides were successfully identified from a phage-displayed peptide library. A chemicallysynthesized peptide composed of the Thr-Gly-Ala-Asp-Leu-Asn-Thr sequence showed an extremely high binding constant for the PEI films (5.6 × 108 M -1), which was more than three orders of magnitude greater than that for the reference polystyrene films. The peptide was biotinylated and immobilized onto the PEI films to further immobilize streptavidin (SAv). The amount of SAv bound depended on the density of immobilized peptide. It gradually increased with an increasing density of immobilized peptide and achieved a maximum (2.1 pmol cm -2) at a peptide density of 19.8 pmol cm -2. The ratio of peptide used for immobilizing SAv at the maximum value was only 11%, and was partially due to the low accessibility of SAv to the biotin moieties on the PEI films. Moreover, the amount of SAv bound gradually decreased at higher peptide densities, suggesting that the clustering of the peptides also inhibited the binding of SAv. Furthermore, peptides on the PEI films promoted the uniform immobilization of SAv with less structural denaturing. The immobilized SAv was able to further immobilize probe DNA to hybridize with its complementary DNA. These present results suggest that the density of immobilized peptide has a great impact on the surface modifications using polymerbinding peptides.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-359
Number of pages9
JournalACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 23 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)

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