Polymorphisms in estrogen related genes may modify the protective effect of isoflavones against prostate cancer risk in Japanese men

Tomoko Sonoda, Hiromu Suzuki, Mitsuru Mori, Taiji Tsukamoto, Akira Yokomizo, Seiji Naito, Kiyohide Fujimoto, Yoshihiko Hirao, Naoto Miyanaga, Hideyuki Akaza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Soy isoflavones and estrogen related genes may play a major role in the etiology of prostate cancer. This study examined whether the genetic polymorphisms of estrogen receptors (ESR-α and ESR-β) and cytochrome P450 19A1 (CYP19A1) modified the protective effect of isoflavones against prostate cancer. One hundred and eighty cases and 177 controls were selected from three geographic areas of Japan. The odds ratio for more than or equal to 60 versus less than 60 mg/day of the intake of isoflavones was 0.63 (95% confidence interval=0.41-0.96). The TTTA long repeat was significantly associated with an increased risk (odds ratio=1.76, 95% confidence interval=1.15-5.70). The interaction between the polymorphisms and the intake of isoflavones on prostate cancer risk was analyzed by the multifactor dimensionality reduction method. The combination of the TTTA long repeats and the minor alleles of rs10046 in CYP19A1 and rs2077647 in ESR-α was a high risk for prostate cancer despite greater than or equal to 60 mg isoflavones/day. The combination of the TTTA short repeat and those homozygous for the major allele of rs10046 in CYP19A1 was low risk despite less than 60 mg isoflavones/day. In conclusion, the findings of this case-control study suggest that the protective effect of isoflavones may differ between the genotypes of estrogen related genes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-137
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Prevention
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Polymorphisms in estrogen related genes may modify the protective effect of isoflavones against prostate cancer risk in Japanese men'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this