Pooled analysis of the associations between body mass index, total cholesterol, and liver cancer-related mortality in Japan

EPOCH-JAPAN Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: We employed a large-scale pooled analysis to investigate the association of liver cancer-related mortality with being overweight/obese and total cholesterol (TC) levels, since limited and inconsistent data on these associations exist in Japan. Methods: A total of 59,332 participants (23,853 men and 35,479 women) from 12 cohorts without a history of cancer who were followed for a median of 14.3 years were analyzed. A sex-specific stratified Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age and other potential confounders was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for liver cancer-related mortality. Results: A total of 447 participants (266 men and 181 women) died of liver cancer within the follow-up period. Individuals classified as having a high BMI (≥25.0 kg/m 2 ) and low TC levels (< 160 mg/dL) had a significantly increased risk for liver cancer-related mortality (HR 7.05, 95% CI 4.41-11.26 in men; HR 8.07, 95% CI 4.76-13.67 in women) when compared with those in the intermediate BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m 2 ) and TC (160-219 mg/dL) categories. These associations remained after limiting the follow-up duration to > 5 years. Conclusion: Being overweight/obese, combined with low TC levels, was strongly associated with liver cancer-related mortality in the EPOCH-JAPAN.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2089-2095
Number of pages7
JournalAsian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2018

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Liver Neoplasms
Japan
Body Mass Index
Cholesterol
Mortality
Confidence Intervals
Proportional Hazards Models
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Pooled analysis of the associations between body mass index, total cholesterol, and liver cancer-related mortality in Japan. / EPOCH-JAPAN Research Group.

In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 19, No. 8, 01.08.2018, p. 2089-2095.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Pooled analysis of the associations between body mass index, total cholesterol, and liver cancer-related mortality in Japan",
abstract = "Objective: We employed a large-scale pooled analysis to investigate the association of liver cancer-related mortality with being overweight/obese and total cholesterol (TC) levels, since limited and inconsistent data on these associations exist in Japan. Methods: A total of 59,332 participants (23,853 men and 35,479 women) from 12 cohorts without a history of cancer who were followed for a median of 14.3 years were analyzed. A sex-specific stratified Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age and other potential confounders was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI) for liver cancer-related mortality. Results: A total of 447 participants (266 men and 181 women) died of liver cancer within the follow-up period. Individuals classified as having a high BMI (≥25.0 kg/m 2 ) and low TC levels (< 160 mg/dL) had a significantly increased risk for liver cancer-related mortality (HR 7.05, 95{\%} CI 4.41-11.26 in men; HR 8.07, 95{\%} CI 4.76-13.67 in women) when compared with those in the intermediate BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m 2 ) and TC (160-219 mg/dL) categories. These associations remained after limiting the follow-up duration to > 5 years. Conclusion: Being overweight/obese, combined with low TC levels, was strongly associated with liver cancer-related mortality in the EPOCH-JAPAN.",
author = "{EPOCH-JAPAN Research Group} and Shigekazu Ukawa and Akiko Tamakoshi and Yoshitaka Murakami and Yutaka Kiyohara and Michiko Yamada and Masato Nagai and Atsushi Satoh and Katsuyuki Miura and Hirotsugu Ueshima and Tomonori Okamura and Yutaka Imai and Takayoshi Ohkubo and Fujiko Irie and Hiroyasu Iso and Akihiko Kitamura and Toshiharu Ninomiya and Hideaki Nakagawa and Takeo Nakayama and Akira Okayama and Toshimi Sairenchi and Shigeyuki Saitoh and Kiyomi Sakata and Ichiro Tsuji and Masahiko Kiyama and Yoshihiro Miyamoto and Shizukiyo Ishikawa and Hiroshi Yatsuya",
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T1 - Pooled analysis of the associations between body mass index, total cholesterol, and liver cancer-related mortality in Japan

AU - EPOCH-JAPAN Research Group

AU - Ukawa, Shigekazu

AU - Tamakoshi, Akiko

AU - Murakami, Yoshitaka

AU - Kiyohara, Yutaka

AU - Yamada, Michiko

AU - Nagai, Masato

AU - Satoh, Atsushi

AU - Miura, Katsuyuki

AU - Ueshima, Hirotsugu

AU - Okamura, Tomonori

AU - Imai, Yutaka

AU - Ohkubo, Takayoshi

AU - Irie, Fujiko

AU - Iso, Hiroyasu

AU - Kitamura, Akihiko

AU - Ninomiya, Toshiharu

AU - Nakagawa, Hideaki

AU - Nakayama, Takeo

AU - Okayama, Akira

AU - Sairenchi, Toshimi

AU - Saitoh, Shigeyuki

AU - Sakata, Kiyomi

AU - Tsuji, Ichiro

AU - Kiyama, Masahiko

AU - Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

AU - Ishikawa, Shizukiyo

AU - Yatsuya, Hiroshi

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - Objective: We employed a large-scale pooled analysis to investigate the association of liver cancer-related mortality with being overweight/obese and total cholesterol (TC) levels, since limited and inconsistent data on these associations exist in Japan. Methods: A total of 59,332 participants (23,853 men and 35,479 women) from 12 cohorts without a history of cancer who were followed for a median of 14.3 years were analyzed. A sex-specific stratified Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age and other potential confounders was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for liver cancer-related mortality. Results: A total of 447 participants (266 men and 181 women) died of liver cancer within the follow-up period. Individuals classified as having a high BMI (≥25.0 kg/m 2 ) and low TC levels (< 160 mg/dL) had a significantly increased risk for liver cancer-related mortality (HR 7.05, 95% CI 4.41-11.26 in men; HR 8.07, 95% CI 4.76-13.67 in women) when compared with those in the intermediate BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m 2 ) and TC (160-219 mg/dL) categories. These associations remained after limiting the follow-up duration to > 5 years. Conclusion: Being overweight/obese, combined with low TC levels, was strongly associated with liver cancer-related mortality in the EPOCH-JAPAN.

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