Population genetic structure, diversity and stocking effect of the oriental weatherloach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) in an isolated island

Yuichi Kano, Katsutoshi Watanabe, Shin Nishida, Ryo Kakioka, Chris Wood, Yukihiro Shimatani, Yôichi Kawaguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genetic endemism of island organisms and the threat to such organisms provided by artificially introduced genes are aspects of major interest in evolutionary and conservation studies of fishes. In this paper the genetic population structure of the oriental weatherloach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, in Sado Island of Japan was elucidated by phylogeographic analysis based on partial mitochondrial control region sequences. The specimens were sampled at 62 sites in Sado Island and 14 sites on the mainland close to the island. We found various haplotypes of different origins, most of which had already been reported from the mainland and other places of Japan. This suggests that the loach has been historically introduced to the island from various regions of Japan. Of the 62 sites on the island, cultured/nonnative individuals were confirmed to have been stocked at eight specific sites for feeding of re-introduced Japanese crested ibis (Nipponia nippon). By a Mantel test, geographical and genetic distances were not significantly correlated among the local populations in Sado Island. However a significant correlation was found when the eight stocked local populations were excluded from the analysis. This implied that the genetic distribution pattern of the loach on the island has been disturbed by the stocking. In addition, the nucleotide diversity values of stocked local populations were significantly higher than those of other local populations, also a likely outcome of the stocking. In conclusion, the loach on the island likely had their origins in multiple historical introductions and colonizations, where more recent stocking for the ibis has caused further genetic disturbance to their local populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-222
Number of pages12
JournalEnvironmental Biology of Fishes
Volume90
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2011

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Misgurnus anguillicaudatus
genetic structure
population genetics
Cobitidae
Japan
effect
stocking
organisms
endemism
genetic distance
population structure
haplotypes
indigenous species
colonization
nucleotides
disturbance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science

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Population genetic structure, diversity and stocking effect of the oriental weatherloach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) in an isolated island. / Kano, Yuichi; Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Nishida, Shin; Kakioka, Ryo; Wood, Chris; Shimatani, Yukihiro; Kawaguchi, Yôichi.

In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, Vol. 90, No. 3, 01.03.2011, p. 211-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kano, Yuichi ; Watanabe, Katsutoshi ; Nishida, Shin ; Kakioka, Ryo ; Wood, Chris ; Shimatani, Yukihiro ; Kawaguchi, Yôichi. / Population genetic structure, diversity and stocking effect of the oriental weatherloach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) in an isolated island. In: Environmental Biology of Fishes. 2011 ; Vol. 90, No. 3. pp. 211-222.
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