Pre-cooling with intermittent ice ingestion lowers the core temperature in a hot environment as compared with the ingestion of a single bolus

Takashi Naito, Tetsuro Ogaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The timing in which ice is ingested may be important for optimizing its success. However, the effects of differences in the timing of ice ingestion has not been studied in resting participants. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of differences in the timing of ice ingestion on rectal temperature (Tre) and rating of perceptual sensation in a hot environment. Seven males ingested 1.25 g kg-1 of crushed ice (ICE1.25: 0.5 °C) or cold water (CON: 4 °C) every 5 min for 30 min, or were given 7.5 g kgBM-1 of crushed ice (ICE7.5) to consume for 30 min in a hot environment (35 °C, 30% relative humidity). The participants then remained at rest for 1 h. As physiological indices, Tre, body mass and urine specific gravity were measured. Rating of thermal sensation was measured at 5-min intervals throughout the experiment. ICE1.25 continued to decrease Tre until approximately 50 min, and resulted in a greater reduction in Tre (-0.56±0.20 °C) than ICE7.5 (-0.41±0.14 °C). Tre was reduced from 40 to 75 min by ICE1.25, which is a significant reduction in comparison to ICE7.5 (p<.05). Mean RTS with ICE1.25 at 50-65 min was significantly lower than that with ICE7.5 (p<.05). These results suggest that pre-cooling with intermittent ice ingestion is a more effective strategy both for lowering the Tre and for the rating of thermal sensation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-17
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Thermal Biology
Volume59
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

cooling
Eating
ingestion
Cooling
Temperature
temperature
heat
Hot Temperature
specific gravity
Specific Gravity
body temperature
Humidity
relative humidity
urine
Density (specific gravity)
Atmospheric humidity
Body Mass Index
Urine
Water
water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Biochemistry
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Pre-cooling with intermittent ice ingestion lowers the core temperature in a hot environment as compared with the ingestion of a single bolus. / Naito, Takashi; Ogaki, Tetsuro.

In: Journal of Thermal Biology, Vol. 59, 01.07.2016, p. 13-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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