Preference for peers in infancy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous findings suggest that infants prefer other infants from among individuals of various ages. There are two explanations for this: one is that like adults, infants prefer babyish characteristics; the other is that infants prefer individuals who are similar to themselves. We examined whether infants respond differently to same-age infants from among older or younger infants. This might allow the possibility of methodologically separating the two explanations for peer preference in infancy. The results revealed that 9-month-olds showed peer preference when they saw movies of infants. Further experiments showed that 6- and 9-month-olds preferred static images of same-age infants. The lack of preference of 6-month-olds for movies of same-age infants could be related to their ability to process information. Thus, the cue for peer preference may be physical similarity to oneself, rather than the strength of babyish characteristics reflecting a particular developmental stage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)584-593
Number of pages10
JournalInfant Behavior and Development
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2006

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Motion Pictures
Aptitude
Cues

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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Preference for peers in infancy. / Sanefuji, Wakako; Ohgami, Hidehiro; Hashiya, Kazuhide.

In: Infant Behavior and Development, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.12.2006, p. 584-593.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanefuji, Wakako ; Ohgami, Hidehiro ; Hashiya, Kazuhide. / Preference for peers in infancy. In: Infant Behavior and Development. 2006 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 584-593.
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