Preferential accumulation of activated Th1 cells not only in rheumatoid arthritis but also in osteoarthritis joints

Hisakata Yamada, Yasuharu Nakashima, Ken Okazaki, Taro Mawatari, Jun-Ichi Fukushi, Akiko Oyamada, Kenjiro Fujimura, Yukihide Iwamoto, Yasunobu Yoshikai

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Abstract

Objective. It was previously found that Th1 but not Th17 cells were predominant in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To verify whether this is a unique feature of CD4 T cells in RA joints, we performed comparative flow cytometric analysis of CD4 T cells in RA and osteoarthritis (OA) joints. Methods. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood (PB), synovial membrane (SM), and synovial fluid (SF) from a total of 18 RA and 12 OA patients. The expression of surface molecules and cytokine production of CD4 T cells was examined by a flow cytometer. Results. Most CD4 T cells in RA joints expressed memory/activation markers, such as CD45RO, HLA-DR, and CD69. CCR5 was highly expressed on CD4 T cells in SF but not in PB or SM. With regard to Th17-related molecules, CD4 T cells expressing CCR6 were not enriched in either SF or SM. In contrast, CD161-positive cells were abundant in the joint, many of which, however, produced interferon-γ but not interleukin 17A. Virtually all T cells in OA joints, although much less numerous than in RA joints, expressed activation markers. Th1 cells were predominant in both OA and RA joints, while there were a few Th17 cells. The frequency of Th17 cells in the joint tended to be lower in OA than RA. Conclusion. There was a quantitative but not qualitative difference in CD4 T cells, including the expression of activation markers and cytokine profiles, between RA and OA joints. The Journal of Rheumatology

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1569-1575
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2011

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Th1 Cells
Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Joints
T-Lymphocytes
Th17 Cells
Synovial Membrane
Synovial Fluid
Cytokines
CD4 Antigens
Interleukin-17
Rheumatology
HLA-DR Antigens
Interferons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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Preferential accumulation of activated Th1 cells not only in rheumatoid arthritis but also in osteoarthritis joints. / Yamada, Hisakata; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Okazaki, Ken; Mawatari, Taro; Fukushi, Jun-Ichi; Oyamada, Akiko; Fujimura, Kenjiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Yoshikai, Yasunobu.

In: Journal of Rheumatology, Vol. 38, No. 8, 01.08.2011, p. 1569-1575.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamada, H, Nakashima, Y, Okazaki, K, Mawatari, T, Fukushi, J-I, Oyamada, A, Fujimura, K, Iwamoto, Y & Yoshikai, Y 2011, 'Preferential accumulation of activated Th1 cells not only in rheumatoid arthritis but also in osteoarthritis joints', Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 38, no. 8, pp. 1569-1575. https://doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.101355
Yamada, Hisakata ; Nakashima, Yasuharu ; Okazaki, Ken ; Mawatari, Taro ; Fukushi, Jun-Ichi ; Oyamada, Akiko ; Fujimura, Kenjiro ; Iwamoto, Yukihide ; Yoshikai, Yasunobu. / Preferential accumulation of activated Th1 cells not only in rheumatoid arthritis but also in osteoarthritis joints. In: Journal of Rheumatology. 2011 ; Vol. 38, No. 8. pp. 1569-1575.
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