Pregabalin Reduces Muscle and Cutaneous Hyperalgesia in Two Models of Chronic Muscle Pain in Rats

Takeshi Yokoyama, Yumi Maeda, Katherine M. Audette, Kathleen A. Sluka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Pregabalin is used for treatment of neuropathic pain conditions. The present study evaluated effects of pregabalin in 2 rat models of muscle-induced hyperalgesia: Inflammatory and noninflammatory. Muscle hyperalgesia (withdrawal threshold to compression of the muscle) and cutaneous hyperalgesia of the paw (withdrawal threshold to von Frey filaments) were measured before and after induction of hyperalgesia and after treatment with pregabalin (saline, 10 to 100 mg/kg i.p.). In the inflammatory model, 3% carrageenan injected into 1 gastrocnemius muscle decreased the mechanical withdrawal threshold of the paw bilaterally and the compression withdrawal threshold of the muscle ipsilaterally 2 weeks later. Pregabalin (10 to 100 mg/kg) increased the compression withdrawal threshold of the inflamed muscle when compared with vehicle controls. Pregabalin also increased the mechanical withdrawal threshold of the paw bilaterally, but only with 100 mg/kg. In the noninflammatory model, 2 unilateral injections of acidic saline into the gastrocnemius muscle produced bilateral cutaneous and muscle hyperalgesia 24 hours after the second injection. Pregabalin (10 to 100 mg/kg i.p.) significantly increased the compression withdrawal thresholds of the muscle and the mechanical withdrawal threshold of the paw bilaterally when compared with vehicle. However, pregabalin also has significant motor effects at the higher doses (60 to 100 mg/kg). Therefore, pregabalin reduces both muscle and cutaneous hyperalgesia that occurs after muscle insult in 2 animal models of muscle pain at doses that do not produce ataxia. Perspective: This study shows that pregabalin reduces both cutaneous and muscle hyperalgesia in inflammatory and noninflammatory models of muscle pain. Thus, pregabalin may be an effective treatment for people with chronic muscle pain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)422-429
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pain
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2007

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Myalgia
Hyperalgesia
Chronic Pain
Muscles
Skin
Skeletal Muscle
Pregabalin
Injections
Carrageenan
Neuralgia
Ataxia
Therapeutics
Animal Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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Pregabalin Reduces Muscle and Cutaneous Hyperalgesia in Two Models of Chronic Muscle Pain in Rats. / Yokoyama, Takeshi; Maeda, Yumi; Audette, Katherine M.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

In: Journal of Pain, Vol. 8, No. 5, 01.05.2007, p. 422-429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yokoyama, Takeshi ; Maeda, Yumi ; Audette, Katherine M. ; Sluka, Kathleen A. / Pregabalin Reduces Muscle and Cutaneous Hyperalgesia in Two Models of Chronic Muscle Pain in Rats. In: Journal of Pain. 2007 ; Vol. 8, No. 5. pp. 422-429.
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