Prenoids and palmitate: Lipids that control the biological activity of Ras proteins

Kiyoko Kato, Channing J. Der, Janice E. Buss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ras proteins can be modified by two types of lipids - an isoprenoid and the fatty acid palmitate. These lipids help the otherwise cytoplasmic Ras protein to interact with the plasma membrane of a cell. The biological consequences of this association between Ras and membranes are dramatic, and can alter a cell's behavior from normal growth into malignancy. The scope and limits of our knowledge of the steps, structures and enzymes involved in this molecular transformation from soluble inactivity to membrane-bound potency are offered below. The prospects of regulating Ras function by controlling its intracellular location provides a tantalizing opportunity to translate research into a novel therapeutic reality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)179-188
Number of pages10
JournalSeminars in Cancer Biology
Volume3
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

ras Proteins
Palmitates
Lipids
Membranes
Terpenes
Fatty Acids
Cell Membrane
Enzymes
Growth
Research
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Prenoids and palmitate : Lipids that control the biological activity of Ras proteins. / Kato, Kiyoko; Der, Channing J.; Buss, Janice E.

In: Seminars in Cancer Biology, Vol. 3, No. 4, 08.1992, p. 179-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kato, Kiyoko ; Der, Channing J. ; Buss, Janice E. / Prenoids and palmitate : Lipids that control the biological activity of Ras proteins. In: Seminars in Cancer Biology. 1992 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 179-188.
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