Preoperative simulation regarding the appropriate port location for laparoscopic hepaticojejunostomy: a randomized study using a disease-specific training simulator

Takahiro Jimbo, Satoshi Ieiri, Satoshi Obata, Munenori Uemura, Ryota Sozaki, Noriyuki Matsuoka, Tamotsu Katayama, Kouji Masumoto, Makoto Hashizume, Tomoaki Taguchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We verified the appropriate port location for laparoscopic hepaticojejunostomy using a comprehensive laparoscopic training simulator. Methods: We developed a hepaticojejunostomy model, consist of common hepatic duct and intestine and participants required to place two sutures precisely using two different port locations (A: standard port location, B: modified port location). The order of tasks was randomly determined using the permuted block method (Group I: Task A → Task B, Group II: Task B → Task A). The time for task completion and total number of errors were recorded. In addition, we evaluated the spatial paths and velocity of both forceps. Statistical analyses were performed using a statistical software program. Results: The time for the task, the total error score, and the spatial paths and velocity of both forceps were not significantly different between groups I and II. Furthermore, the port location and order of tasks (group I or group II) did not significantly affect the results. In contrast, there were significant differences in the performance between experts and novices, who were classified as such based on the total number of experienced endoscopic surgeries. Conclusion: Preoperative port simulation in advanced surgery using our artificial simulator is feasible and may facilitate minimally invasive surgery for children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)901-907
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Surgery International
Volume32
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Surgical Instruments
Common Hepatic Duct
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Sutures
Intestines
Software

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

Cite this

Preoperative simulation regarding the appropriate port location for laparoscopic hepaticojejunostomy : a randomized study using a disease-specific training simulator. / Jimbo, Takahiro; Ieiri, Satoshi; Obata, Satoshi; Uemura, Munenori; Sozaki, Ryota; Matsuoka, Noriyuki; Katayama, Tamotsu; Masumoto, Kouji; Hashizume, Makoto; Taguchi, Tomoaki.

In: Pediatric Surgery International, Vol. 32, No. 9, 01.09.2016, p. 901-907.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jimbo, Takahiro ; Ieiri, Satoshi ; Obata, Satoshi ; Uemura, Munenori ; Sozaki, Ryota ; Matsuoka, Noriyuki ; Katayama, Tamotsu ; Masumoto, Kouji ; Hashizume, Makoto ; Taguchi, Tomoaki. / Preoperative simulation regarding the appropriate port location for laparoscopic hepaticojejunostomy : a randomized study using a disease-specific training simulator. In: Pediatric Surgery International. 2016 ; Vol. 32, No. 9. pp. 901-907.
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N2 - Purpose: We verified the appropriate port location for laparoscopic hepaticojejunostomy using a comprehensive laparoscopic training simulator. Methods: We developed a hepaticojejunostomy model, consist of common hepatic duct and intestine and participants required to place two sutures precisely using two different port locations (A: standard port location, B: modified port location). The order of tasks was randomly determined using the permuted block method (Group I: Task A → Task B, Group II: Task B → Task A). The time for task completion and total number of errors were recorded. In addition, we evaluated the spatial paths and velocity of both forceps. Statistical analyses were performed using a statistical software program. Results: The time for the task, the total error score, and the spatial paths and velocity of both forceps were not significantly different between groups I and II. Furthermore, the port location and order of tasks (group I or group II) did not significantly affect the results. In contrast, there were significant differences in the performance between experts and novices, who were classified as such based on the total number of experienced endoscopic surgeries. Conclusion: Preoperative port simulation in advanced surgery using our artificial simulator is feasible and may facilitate minimally invasive surgery for children.

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