Prevalence rate of Internet addiction among Japanese college students: Two cross-sectional studies and reconsideration of cut-off points of Young's Internet Addiction Test in Japan

Masaru Tateno, Alan R. Teo, Masaki Shiraishi, Masaya Tayama, Chiaki Kawanishi, Takahiro Kato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Due to variation in estimates of the prevalence of Internet addiction (IA) in prior research, we conducted two cross-sectional studies over 2 years investigating the prevalence rate of IA in college students in Japan and reconsidered appropriate cut-off points of a self-rating scale to screen possible IA. Methods: This study was composed of two parts: survey I in 2014 and survey II in 2016, which were conducted in the same schools with an interval of 2 years. The study questionnaire included questions about demographics and Internet use, and Young's Internet Addiction Test (IAT). Additionally, the subjects in survey II were asked about self-reported IA. Results: There were 1005 respondents in total with a mean age (± SD) of 18.9 ± 1.3 years. The mean IAT scores remained stable between 2014 and 2016: 45.2 ± 12.6 in survey I and 45.5 ± 13.1 in survey II (overall mean IAT score of 45.4 ± 13.0). With respect to self-reported IA in survey II, a total of 21.6% admitted to having IA (score of 5 or 6 on a 6-point Likert scale). We categorized these subjects as IA, and the remainder as non-IA. The mean IAT score showed a significant difference between these two groups (57.8 ± 14.3 vs 42.1 ± 10.7, P < 0.001). Conclusion: The severity of IA symptoms among Japanese college students has appeared stable in recent years, with mean IAT scores of over 40. Our results suggest that a screening score cut-off of 40 on the IAT could be reconsidered and that 50 might be proposed for the cut-off.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)723-730
Number of pages8
JournalPsychiatry and clinical neurosciences
Volume72
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2018

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Internet
Japan
Cross-Sectional Studies
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Prevalence rate of Internet addiction among Japanese college students : Two cross-sectional studies and reconsideration of cut-off points of Young's Internet Addiction Test in Japan. / Tateno, Masaru; Teo, Alan R.; Shiraishi, Masaki; Tayama, Masaya; Kawanishi, Chiaki; Kato, Takahiro.

In: Psychiatry and clinical neurosciences, Vol. 72, No. 9, 01.09.2018, p. 723-730.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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