Preventive effects of a phospholipid polymer coating on PMMA on biofilm formation by oral streptococci

Yukie Shibata, Yoshihisa Yamashita, Kanji Tsuru, Kazuhiko Ishihara, Kyoko Fukazawa, Kunio Ishikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The regulation of biofilm formation on dental materials such as denture bases is key to oral health. Recently, a biocompatible phospholipid polymer, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB) coating, was reported to inhibit sucrose-dependent biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans, a cariogenic bacterium, on the surface of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) denture bases. However, S. mutans is a minor component of the oral microbiome and does not play an important role in biofilm formation in the absence of sucrose. Other, more predominant oral streptococci must play an indispensable role in sucrose-independent biofilm formation. In the present study, the effect of PMB coating on PMMA was evaluated using various oral streptococci that are known to be initial colonizers during biofilm formation on tooth surfaces. PMB coating on PMMA drastically reduced sucrose-dependent tight biofilm formation by two cariogenic bacteria (S. mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus), among seven tested oral streptococci, as described previously [N. Takahashi, F. Iwasa, Y. Inoue, H. Morisaki, K. Ishihara, K. Baba, J. Prosthet. Dent. 112 (2014) 194–203]. Streptococci other than S. mutans and S. sobrinus did not exhibit tight biofilm formation even in the presence of sucrose. On the other hand, all seven species of oral streptococci exhibited distinctly reduced glucose-dependent soft biofilm retention on PMB-coated PMMA. We conclude that PMB coating on PMMA surfaces inhibits biofilm attachment by initial colonizer oral streptococci, even in the absence of sucrose, indicating that PMB coating may help maintain clean conditions on PMMA surfaces in the oral cavity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)602-607
Number of pages6
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume390
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 30 2016

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Phospholipids
Biofilms
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Polymethyl methacrylates
Polymers
Sugar (sucrose)
Coatings
Sucrose
Dental prostheses
Bacteria
Dental materials
Dental Materials
Glucose
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Preventive effects of a phospholipid polymer coating on PMMA on biofilm formation by oral streptococci. / Shibata, Yukie; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Tsuru, Kanji; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishikawa, Kunio.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 390, 30.12.2016, p. 602-607.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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