Primary gut symbiont and secondary, sodalis-allied symbiont of the scutellerid stinkbug cantao ocellatus

Nahomi Kaiwa, Takahiro Hosokawa, Yoshitomo Kikuchi, Naruo Nikoh, Xian Ying Meng, Nobutada Kimura, Motomi Ito, Takema Fukatsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Symbiotic associations with midgut bacteria have been commonly found in diverse phytophagous heteropteran groups, where microbiological characterization of the symbiotic bacteria has been restricted to the stinkbug families Acanthosomatidae, Plataspidae, Pentatomidae, Alydidae, and Pyrrhocoridae. Here we investigated the midgut bacterial symbiont of Cantao ocellatus, a stinkbug of the family Scutelleridae. A specific gammaproteobacterium was consistently identified from the insects of different geographic origins. The bacterium was detected in all 116 insects collected from 9 natural host populations. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the bacterium constitutes a distinct lineage in the Gammaproteobacteria, not closely related to gut symbionts of other stinkbugs. Diagnostic PCR and in situ hybridization demonstrated that the bacterium is extracellularly located in the midgut 4th section with crypts. Electron microscopy of the crypts revealed a peculiar histological configuration at the host-symblont interface. Egg sterilization experiments confirmed that the bacterium is vertically transmitted to stinkbug nymphs via egg surface contamination. In addition to the gut symbiont, some individuals of C. ocellatus harbored another bacterial symbiont in their gonads, which was closely related to Sodalis glossinidius, the secondary endosymbiont of tsetse flies. Biological aspects of the primary gut symbiont and the secondary Sodalis-allied symbiont are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3486-3494
Number of pages9
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume76
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Sodalis
Enterobacteriaceae
symbiont
symbionts
digestive system
Bacteria
bacterium
bacteria
midgut
Gammaproteobacteria
gamma-Proteobacteria
Ovum
Insects
Sodalis glossinidius
Plataspidae
Alydidae
Scutelleridae
Pyrrhocoridae
tsetse fly
insect

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Primary gut symbiont and secondary, sodalis-allied symbiont of the scutellerid stinkbug cantao ocellatus. / Kaiwa, Nahomi; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Nikoh, Naruo; Meng, Xian Ying; Kimura, Nobutada; Ito, Motomi; Fukatsu, Takema.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 76, No. 11, 01.06.2010, p. 3486-3494.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaiwa, Nahomi ; Hosokawa, Takahiro ; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo ; Nikoh, Naruo ; Meng, Xian Ying ; Kimura, Nobutada ; Ito, Motomi ; Fukatsu, Takema. / Primary gut symbiont and secondary, sodalis-allied symbiont of the scutellerid stinkbug cantao ocellatus. In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 2010 ; Vol. 76, No. 11. pp. 3486-3494.
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