Programmed cell death in barley aleurone cells is not directly stimulated by reactive oxygen species produced in response to gibberellin

Nozomi Aoki, Yushi Ishibashi, Kyohei Kai, Reisa Tomokiyo, Takashi Yuasa, Mari Iwaya-Inoue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue that produces enzymes to hydrolyze the starchy endosperm during germination. We recently demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced in response to gibberellins (GA), promoted GAMyb expression, which induces α-amylase expression in barley aleurone cells. On the other hand, ROS levels increase during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone cells, and GAMyb is involved in PCD of these cells. In this study, we investigated whether the ROS produced in response to GA regulate PCD directly by using mutants of Slender1 (SLN1), a DELLA protein that negatively regulates GA signaling. The wild-type, the sln1c mutant (which exhibits gibberellin-type signaling even in the absence of GA), and the Sln1d mutant (which is gibberellin-insensitive with respect to α-amylase production) all produced ROS in response to GA, suggesting that ROS production in aleurone cells in response to GA is independent of GA signaling through this DELLA protein. Exogenous GA promoted PCD in the wild-type. PCD in sln1c was induced even without exogenous GA (and so without induction of ROS), whereas PCD in Sln1d was not induced in the presence of exogenous GA, even though the ROS content increased significantly in response to GA. These results suggest that PCD in barley aleurone cells is not directly stimulated by ROS produced in response to GA but is regulated by GA signaling through DELLA protein.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)615-618
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Plant Physiology
Volume171
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2014

Fingerprint

aleurone cells
Gibberellins
Hordeum
gibberellins
reactive oxygen species
Reactive Oxygen Species
Cell Death
apoptosis
barley
Amylases
amylases
mutants
aleurone layer
Endosperm
Proteins
proteins
Germination
endosperm
germination

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Programmed cell death in barley aleurone cells is not directly stimulated by reactive oxygen species produced in response to gibberellin. / Aoki, Nozomi; Ishibashi, Yushi; Kai, Kyohei; Tomokiyo, Reisa; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari.

In: Journal of Plant Physiology, Vol. 171, No. 8, 01.05.2014, p. 615-618.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aoki, Nozomi ; Ishibashi, Yushi ; Kai, Kyohei ; Tomokiyo, Reisa ; Yuasa, Takashi ; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari. / Programmed cell death in barley aleurone cells is not directly stimulated by reactive oxygen species produced in response to gibberellin. In: Journal of Plant Physiology. 2014 ; Vol. 171, No. 8. pp. 615-618.
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