Proposal for using underground mine and geothermal resources for sustainable communities

Y. Koizumi, Masami Nakagawa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

It has become more important for communities to utilize locally available renewable energy sources. The use of renewable energy can reduce environmental impacts and potentially provide long-term cost savings for communities. In this paper, the authors propose a system that could cool buildings in summer and melt snow on the pedestrian sidewalks in winter using an abandoned underground mine and a hot spring in Idaho Springs, Colorado. In the proposed system, an underground mine would be used as cold thermal energy storage, and the heat of geothermal hot fluid transported from the hot spring would be re-used to melt snow in the historic downtown. To assess the feasibility of the proposed system, we conducted a series of temperature measurements at the Edgar Mine (Colorado School of Mines' Experimental Mine) and heat transfer analyses of the geothermal hot fluid flowing through pipes that will be buried in the ground under the city. The temperature measurements proved that the temperature of the underground mine was low so that we could store cold groundwater for use in summer. Furthermore, the temperature profiles of two different tunnels in the Edgar Mine were discussed to determine the most appropriate place to store cold groundwater for summer use. In the heat transfer analyses, the heat loss of the geothermal hot fluid during its transportation was calculated, and then the heat requirement for snow melting and heat supply from the geothermal hot fluid were compared. It was concluded that the heat supply in the present situation was not sufficient enough to melt snow in the whole area of the historic downtown. However, the result indicated that the proposed snow melting system could be realizable if the snow melting area is limited or additional geothermal wells are drilled. We hope this case study will serve as an example of the concept of "local consumption of locally available energy". Many communities in the world do not fully utilize thermal resources in the ground. If such communities start utilizing them in a socially and environmentally responsible manner, it will contribute more to globally sustainable development for mankind.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationISRM International Symposium - 8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014
PublisherInternational Society for Rock Mechanics
Pages2616-2625
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9784907430030
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014 - Sapporo, Japan
Duration: Oct 14 2014Oct 16 2014

Other

Other8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014
CountryJapan
CitySapporo
Period10/14/1410/16/14

Fingerprint

geothermal resources
snow
proposals
resources
Snow
resource
heat
Hot springs
summer
Fluids
renewable energy
fluid
melting
fluids
melt
thermal spring
ground water
Temperature measurement
thermal resources
heat transfer

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Koizumi, Y., & Nakagawa, M. (2014). Proposal for using underground mine and geothermal resources for sustainable communities. In ISRM International Symposium - 8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014 (pp. 2616-2625). International Society for Rock Mechanics.

Proposal for using underground mine and geothermal resources for sustainable communities. / Koizumi, Y.; Nakagawa, Masami.

ISRM International Symposium - 8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014. International Society for Rock Mechanics, 2014. p. 2616-2625.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Koizumi, Y & Nakagawa, M 2014, Proposal for using underground mine and geothermal resources for sustainable communities. in ISRM International Symposium - 8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014. International Society for Rock Mechanics, pp. 2616-2625, 8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014, Sapporo, Japan, 10/14/14.
Koizumi Y, Nakagawa M. Proposal for using underground mine and geothermal resources for sustainable communities. In ISRM International Symposium - 8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014. International Society for Rock Mechanics. 2014. p. 2616-2625
Koizumi, Y. ; Nakagawa, Masami. / Proposal for using underground mine and geothermal resources for sustainable communities. ISRM International Symposium - 8th Asian Rock Mechanics Symposium, ARMS 2014. International Society for Rock Mechanics, 2014. pp. 2616-2625
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