Psychological stress in a Japanese population with systemic lupus erythematosus: Finding from KYSS study

Hiroki Takahashi, Masakazu Washio, Chikako Kiyohara, Yoshifumi Tada, Toyoko Asami, Saburo Ide, Tatsuya Atsumi, Gen Kobashi, Motohisa Yamamoto, Takahiko Horiuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. Daily psychological stress has been proposed as a risk factor for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Western countries. However, there is little information about the relationship between daily psychological stress and the risk of SLE in a Japanese population. We examined the association between SLE and daily psychological stress. Methods. A case-control study was conducted to examine the relationship between daily psychological stress and SLE in Japanese females. The participants were 160 female SLE patients and 660 female volunteers. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute OR and 95% confidence interval (CI), with adjustment for several covariates. Results. Smoking (OR = 2.59; 95% CI, 1.74-3.86), walking (OR = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.81-2.56) and daily psychological stress (OR = 1.88; 95% CI, 1.14-3.10) were increased in patients with SLE after adjusting for age, region and all factors. Smokers with daily psychological stress (OR = 4.70; 95% CI = 2.53-8.77) were more prevalent than nonsmokers without daily psychological stress in SLE. The multiplicative interaction measures between smoking status and daily psychological stress did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions. The present study suggests the possibility that daily psychological stress as well as smoking might be associated with an increased risk of SLE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)448-452
Number of pages5
JournalModern Rheumatology
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2014

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Psychological Stress
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Population
Confidence Intervals
Smoking
Walking
Case-Control Studies
Volunteers
Logistic Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rheumatology

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Psychological stress in a Japanese population with systemic lupus erythematosus : Finding from KYSS study. / Takahashi, Hiroki; Washio, Masakazu; Kiyohara, Chikako; Tada, Yoshifumi; Asami, Toyoko; Ide, Saburo; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Kobashi, Gen; Yamamoto, Motohisa; Horiuchi, Takahiko.

In: Modern Rheumatology, Vol. 24, No. 3, 05.2014, p. 448-452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takahashi, Hiroki ; Washio, Masakazu ; Kiyohara, Chikako ; Tada, Yoshifumi ; Asami, Toyoko ; Ide, Saburo ; Atsumi, Tatsuya ; Kobashi, Gen ; Yamamoto, Motohisa ; Horiuchi, Takahiko. / Psychological stress in a Japanese population with systemic lupus erythematosus : Finding from KYSS study. In: Modern Rheumatology. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 448-452.
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abstract = "Objectives. Daily psychological stress has been proposed as a risk factor for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Western countries. However, there is little information about the relationship between daily psychological stress and the risk of SLE in a Japanese population. We examined the association between SLE and daily psychological stress. Methods. A case-control study was conducted to examine the relationship between daily psychological stress and SLE in Japanese females. The participants were 160 female SLE patients and 660 female volunteers. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute OR and 95{\%} confidence interval (CI), with adjustment for several covariates. Results. Smoking (OR = 2.59; 95{\%} CI, 1.74-3.86), walking (OR = 1.75; 95{\%} CI, 1.81-2.56) and daily psychological stress (OR = 1.88; 95{\%} CI, 1.14-3.10) were increased in patients with SLE after adjusting for age, region and all factors. Smokers with daily psychological stress (OR = 4.70; 95{\%} CI = 2.53-8.77) were more prevalent than nonsmokers without daily psychological stress in SLE. The multiplicative interaction measures between smoking status and daily psychological stress did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions. The present study suggests the possibility that daily psychological stress as well as smoking might be associated with an increased risk of SLE.",
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AU - Tada, Yoshifumi

AU - Asami, Toyoko

AU - Ide, Saburo

AU - Atsumi, Tatsuya

AU - Kobashi, Gen

AU - Yamamoto, Motohisa

AU - Horiuchi, Takahiko

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