Psychosocial Stress, Personality, and the Severity of Chronic Hepatitis C

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This cross-sectional study examined the association between the severity of chronic hepatitis C and the type 1 personality, which has been shown by Grossarth-Maticek to be strongly related to the incidence of cancer and mortality. Sixty-nine patients with chronic hepatitis C completed the Stress Inventory, a self-report questionnaire to measure psychosocial stress and personality, and were classified into three groups according to hepatitis severity: group A, chronic hepatitis C with a normal serum alanine aminotransferase level; group B, chronic hepatitis C with an elevated alanine aminotransferase level; and group C, liver cirrhosis. Each of four scales related to the type 1 personality-low sense of control, object dependence of loss, unfulfilled need for acceptance, and altruism-was significantly and positively associated with hepatitis severity. The type 1 score, calculated as the average of these scales, was also strongly related to hepatitis severity (p<0.0001), and adjustment for age, sex, education level, smoking, drinking, and duration brought no attenuation into the association. Chronic psychosocial stress relevant to the type 1 personality may also influence the course of chronic hepatitis C.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-106
Number of pages7
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2004

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Chronic Hepatitis C
Personality
Hepatitis
Alanine Transaminase
Altruism
Sex Education
Liver Cirrhosis
Self Report
Drinking
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Equipment and Supplies
Mortality
Incidence
Serum
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Psychosocial Stress, Personality, and the Severity of Chronic Hepatitis C. / Nagano, Jun; Nagase, Shoji; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Kubo, Chiharu.

In: Psychosomatics, Vol. 45, No. 2, 01.01.2004, p. 100-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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