Pulse-Width Dependence of the Cooling Effect on Sub-Micrometer ZnO Spherical Particle Formation by Pulsed-Laser Melting in a Liquid

Shota Sakaki, Hiroshi Ikenoue, Takeshi Tsuji, Yoshie Ishikawa, Naoto Koshizaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sub-micrometer spherical particles can be synthesized by irradiating particles in a liquid with a pulsed laser (pulse width: 10 ns). In this method, all of the laser energy is supposed to be spent on particle heating because nanosecond heating is far faster than particle cooling. To study the cooling effect, sub-micrometer spherical particles are fabricated by using a pulsed laser with longer pulse widths (50 and 70 ns). From the increase in the laser-fluence threshold for sub-micrometer spherical particle formation with increasing pulse width, it is concluded that the particles dissipate heat to the surrounding liquid, even during several tens of nanoseconds of heating. A particle heating–cooling model considering the cooling effect is developed to estimate the particle temperature during laser irradiation. This model suggests that the liquid surrounding the particles evaporates, and the generated vapor films suppress heat dissipation from the particles, resulting in efficient heating and melting of the particles in the liquid. In the case of small particle sizes and large pulse widths, the particles dissipate heat to the liquid without forming such vapor films.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1101-1107
Number of pages7
JournalChemPhysChem
Volume18
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 5 2017

Fingerprint

Pulsed lasers
micrometers
pulsed lasers
pulse duration
Melting
melting
Cooling
cooling
Liquids
Heating
liquids
Laser pulses
Vapors
Lasers
Laser beam effects
Heat losses
heating
Particle size
vapors
lasers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Pulse-Width Dependence of the Cooling Effect on Sub-Micrometer ZnO Spherical Particle Formation by Pulsed-Laser Melting in a Liquid. / Sakaki, Shota; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Yoshie; Koshizaki, Naoto.

In: ChemPhysChem, Vol. 18, No. 9, 05.05.2017, p. 1101-1107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sakaki, Shota ; Ikenoue, Hiroshi ; Tsuji, Takeshi ; Ishikawa, Yoshie ; Koshizaki, Naoto. / Pulse-Width Dependence of the Cooling Effect on Sub-Micrometer ZnO Spherical Particle Formation by Pulsed-Laser Melting in a Liquid. In: ChemPhysChem. 2017 ; Vol. 18, No. 9. pp. 1101-1107.
@article{a4105893f509465288109b7eca23c008,
title = "Pulse-Width Dependence of the Cooling Effect on Sub-Micrometer ZnO Spherical Particle Formation by Pulsed-Laser Melting in a Liquid",
abstract = "Sub-micrometer spherical particles can be synthesized by irradiating particles in a liquid with a pulsed laser (pulse width: 10 ns). In this method, all of the laser energy is supposed to be spent on particle heating because nanosecond heating is far faster than particle cooling. To study the cooling effect, sub-micrometer spherical particles are fabricated by using a pulsed laser with longer pulse widths (50 and 70 ns). From the increase in the laser-fluence threshold for sub-micrometer spherical particle formation with increasing pulse width, it is concluded that the particles dissipate heat to the surrounding liquid, even during several tens of nanoseconds of heating. A particle heating–cooling model considering the cooling effect is developed to estimate the particle temperature during laser irradiation. This model suggests that the liquid surrounding the particles evaporates, and the generated vapor films suppress heat dissipation from the particles, resulting in efficient heating and melting of the particles in the liquid. In the case of small particle sizes and large pulse widths, the particles dissipate heat to the liquid without forming such vapor films.",
author = "Shota Sakaki and Hiroshi Ikenoue and Takeshi Tsuji and Yoshie Ishikawa and Naoto Koshizaki",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1002/cphc.201601175",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "1101--1107",
journal = "ChemPhysChem",
issn = "1439-4235",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pulse-Width Dependence of the Cooling Effect on Sub-Micrometer ZnO Spherical Particle Formation by Pulsed-Laser Melting in a Liquid

AU - Sakaki, Shota

AU - Ikenoue, Hiroshi

AU - Tsuji, Takeshi

AU - Ishikawa, Yoshie

AU - Koshizaki, Naoto

PY - 2017/5/5

Y1 - 2017/5/5

N2 - Sub-micrometer spherical particles can be synthesized by irradiating particles in a liquid with a pulsed laser (pulse width: 10 ns). In this method, all of the laser energy is supposed to be spent on particle heating because nanosecond heating is far faster than particle cooling. To study the cooling effect, sub-micrometer spherical particles are fabricated by using a pulsed laser with longer pulse widths (50 and 70 ns). From the increase in the laser-fluence threshold for sub-micrometer spherical particle formation with increasing pulse width, it is concluded that the particles dissipate heat to the surrounding liquid, even during several tens of nanoseconds of heating. A particle heating–cooling model considering the cooling effect is developed to estimate the particle temperature during laser irradiation. This model suggests that the liquid surrounding the particles evaporates, and the generated vapor films suppress heat dissipation from the particles, resulting in efficient heating and melting of the particles in the liquid. In the case of small particle sizes and large pulse widths, the particles dissipate heat to the liquid without forming such vapor films.

AB - Sub-micrometer spherical particles can be synthesized by irradiating particles in a liquid with a pulsed laser (pulse width: 10 ns). In this method, all of the laser energy is supposed to be spent on particle heating because nanosecond heating is far faster than particle cooling. To study the cooling effect, sub-micrometer spherical particles are fabricated by using a pulsed laser with longer pulse widths (50 and 70 ns). From the increase in the laser-fluence threshold for sub-micrometer spherical particle formation with increasing pulse width, it is concluded that the particles dissipate heat to the surrounding liquid, even during several tens of nanoseconds of heating. A particle heating–cooling model considering the cooling effect is developed to estimate the particle temperature during laser irradiation. This model suggests that the liquid surrounding the particles evaporates, and the generated vapor films suppress heat dissipation from the particles, resulting in efficient heating and melting of the particles in the liquid. In the case of small particle sizes and large pulse widths, the particles dissipate heat to the liquid without forming such vapor films.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85013249266&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85013249266&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cphc.201601175

DO - 10.1002/cphc.201601175

M3 - Article

C2 - 28052480

AN - SCOPUS:85013249266

VL - 18

SP - 1101

EP - 1107

JO - ChemPhysChem

JF - ChemPhysChem

SN - 1439-4235

IS - 9

ER -