Pulse width modulation method applied to nonlinear model predictive control on an under-actuated small satellite

Kota Kondo, Yasuhiro Yoshimura, Shuji Nagasaki, Fukuoka Shi Fukuo, Toshiya Hanada

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Among various satellite actuators, magnetic torquers have been widely equipped for stabilization and attitude control of small satellites. Although magnetorquers are generally used with other actuators, such as momentum wheels, this paper explores a control method where only a magnetic actuation is available. We applied a nonlinear optimal control method, Nonlinear Model Predictive Control (NMPC), to small satellites, employing the generalized minimal residual (GMRES) method, which generates continuous control inputs. Onboard magnetic actuation systems often find it challenging to produce smooth magnetic moments as a control input; hence, we employ Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) method, which discretizes a control input and reduces the burden on actuators. In our case, the PWM approach discretizes control torques generated by the NMPC scheme. This study’s main contributions are investigating the NMPC and the GMRES method applied to small spacecraft and presenting the PWM control system’s feasibility.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAIAA Scitech 2021 Forum
PublisherAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc, AIAA
Pages1-19
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)9781624106095
Publication statusPublished - 2021
EventAIAA Science and Technology Forum and Exposition, AIAA SciTech Forum 2021 - Virtual, Online
Duration: Jan 11 2021Jan 15 2021

Publication series

NameAIAA Scitech 2021 Forum

Conference

ConferenceAIAA Science and Technology Forum and Exposition, AIAA SciTech Forum 2021
CityVirtual, Online
Period1/11/211/15/21

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aerospace Engineering

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