Quantitative evaluation of an illusion of fingertip motion

Hiroyuki Okabe, Taku Hachisu, Michi Sato, Shogo Fukushima, Hiroyuki Kajimoto

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In recent years, touch panels have become widespread as an intuitive means to activate device operations. Because the touch panel has a space over which a finger and a corresponding cursor moves, certain actions become intuitive compared to force input-type devices such as a pointing stick. If we could add an illusory feeling of finger motion with the force input interface, it would become more intuitive. We have found a new haptic illusion of "motion", which occurs when an electrical tactile flow is presented on the fingertip while experiencing a shearing force. We have also investigated occurrence conditions, focusing on the relation between shear force and movement speed of the electrical tactile stimulation. In our study, we investigated directional characteristic focusing on the illusory position of the finger perceived using a new electrocutaneous display mounted on a six-axis force sensor.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationITS 2012 - Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces
Pages327-330
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event7th ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces, ITS 2012 - Cambridge, MA, United States
Duration: Nov 11 2012Nov 14 2012

Publication series

NameITS 2012 - Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces

Conference

Conference7th ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces, ITS 2012
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityCambridge, MA
Period11/11/1211/14/12

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Human-Computer Interaction

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