Rapid progress of DNA replication studies in Archaea, the third domain of life

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Archaea, the third domain of life, are interesting organisms to study from the aspects of molecular and evolutionary biology. Archaeal cells have a unicellular ultrastructure without a nucleus, resembling bacterial cells, but the proteins involved in genetic information processing pathways, including DNA replication, transcription, and translation, share strong similarities with those of Eukaryota. Therefore, archaea provide useful model systems to understand the more complex mechanisms of genetic information processing in eukaryotic cells. Moreover, the hyperthermophilic archaea provide very stable proteins, which are especially useful for the isolation of replisomal multicomplexes, to analyze their structures and functions. This review focuses on the history, current status, and future directions of archaeal DNA replication studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)386-403
Number of pages18
JournalScience China Life Sciences
Volume55
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2012

Fingerprint

information processing
Archaea
DNA replication
DNA Replication
Archaeal DNA
Automatic Data Processing
DNA
protein
evolutionary biology
Transcription
ultrastructure
Proteins
Bacterial Proteins
Eukaryotic Cells
Eukaryota
translation (genetics)
eukaryotic cells
Molecular Biology
proteins
transcription (genetics)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Rapid progress of DNA replication studies in Archaea, the third domain of life. / Ishino, Yoshizumi; Ishino, Sonoko.

In: Science China Life Sciences, Vol. 55, No. 5, 01.05.2012, p. 386-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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