Recent advances in the study of structural materials compatibility with hydrogen

M. Dadfarnia, P. Novak, D. C. Ahn, J. B. Liu, Petros Athanasios Sofronis, D. D. Johnson, I. M. Robertson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hydrogen is a ubiquitous element that enters materials from many different sources. It almost always has a deleterious effect on mechanical properties. In non-hydride-forming systems, research to date has identified hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity and hydrogen-induced decohesion as two viable mechanisms for embrittlement. However, a fracture prediction methodology that associates macroscopic parameters with the degradation mechanisms at the microscale has not been established, as of yet. In this article, we report recent work on modeling and simulation of hydrogen-induced crack initiation and growth. Our goal is to develop methodologies to relate characteristics of the degradation mechanisms from microscopic observations and first-principles calculations with macroscopic indices of embrittlement. The approach we use involves finite element analysis of the coupled hydrogen transport problem with hydrogen-assisted elastoplastic deformation, thermodynamic theories of decohesion, and ab initio density functional theory calculations of the hydrogen effect on grain boundaries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1128-1135
Number of pages8
JournalAdvanced Materials
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 12 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hydrogen
Embrittlement
Degradation
Crack initiation
Chemical elements
Density functional theory
Plasticity
Crack propagation
Grain boundaries
Thermodynamics
Finite element method
Mechanical properties

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Dadfarnia, M., Novak, P., Ahn, D. C., Liu, J. B., Sofronis, P. A., Johnson, D. D., & Robertson, I. M. (2010). Recent advances in the study of structural materials compatibility with hydrogen. Advanced Materials, 22(10), 1128-1135. https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.200904354

Recent advances in the study of structural materials compatibility with hydrogen. / Dadfarnia, M.; Novak, P.; Ahn, D. C.; Liu, J. B.; Sofronis, Petros Athanasios; Johnson, D. D.; Robertson, I. M.

In: Advanced Materials, Vol. 22, No. 10, 12.03.2010, p. 1128-1135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dadfarnia, M, Novak, P, Ahn, DC, Liu, JB, Sofronis, PA, Johnson, DD & Robertson, IM 2010, 'Recent advances in the study of structural materials compatibility with hydrogen', Advanced Materials, vol. 22, no. 10, pp. 1128-1135. https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.200904354
Dadfarnia, M. ; Novak, P. ; Ahn, D. C. ; Liu, J. B. ; Sofronis, Petros Athanasios ; Johnson, D. D. ; Robertson, I. M. / Recent advances in the study of structural materials compatibility with hydrogen. In: Advanced Materials. 2010 ; Vol. 22, No. 10. pp. 1128-1135.
@article{0a6d047a95e94ee3905a1be9b2cec0ac,
title = "Recent advances in the study of structural materials compatibility with hydrogen",
abstract = "Hydrogen is a ubiquitous element that enters materials from many different sources. It almost always has a deleterious effect on mechanical properties. In non-hydride-forming systems, research to date has identified hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity and hydrogen-induced decohesion as two viable mechanisms for embrittlement. However, a fracture prediction methodology that associates macroscopic parameters with the degradation mechanisms at the microscale has not been established, as of yet. In this article, we report recent work on modeling and simulation of hydrogen-induced crack initiation and growth. Our goal is to develop methodologies to relate characteristics of the degradation mechanisms from microscopic observations and first-principles calculations with macroscopic indices of embrittlement. The approach we use involves finite element analysis of the coupled hydrogen transport problem with hydrogen-assisted elastoplastic deformation, thermodynamic theories of decohesion, and ab initio density functional theory calculations of the hydrogen effect on grain boundaries.",
author = "M. Dadfarnia and P. Novak and Ahn, {D. C.} and Liu, {J. B.} and Sofronis, {Petros Athanasios} and Johnson, {D. D.} and Robertson, {I. M.}",
year = "2010",
month = "3",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1002/adma.200904354",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "1128--1135",
journal = "Advanced Materials",
issn = "0935-9648",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Recent advances in the study of structural materials compatibility with hydrogen

AU - Dadfarnia, M.

AU - Novak, P.

AU - Ahn, D. C.

AU - Liu, J. B.

AU - Sofronis, Petros Athanasios

AU - Johnson, D. D.

AU - Robertson, I. M.

PY - 2010/3/12

Y1 - 2010/3/12

N2 - Hydrogen is a ubiquitous element that enters materials from many different sources. It almost always has a deleterious effect on mechanical properties. In non-hydride-forming systems, research to date has identified hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity and hydrogen-induced decohesion as two viable mechanisms for embrittlement. However, a fracture prediction methodology that associates macroscopic parameters with the degradation mechanisms at the microscale has not been established, as of yet. In this article, we report recent work on modeling and simulation of hydrogen-induced crack initiation and growth. Our goal is to develop methodologies to relate characteristics of the degradation mechanisms from microscopic observations and first-principles calculations with macroscopic indices of embrittlement. The approach we use involves finite element analysis of the coupled hydrogen transport problem with hydrogen-assisted elastoplastic deformation, thermodynamic theories of decohesion, and ab initio density functional theory calculations of the hydrogen effect on grain boundaries.

AB - Hydrogen is a ubiquitous element that enters materials from many different sources. It almost always has a deleterious effect on mechanical properties. In non-hydride-forming systems, research to date has identified hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity and hydrogen-induced decohesion as two viable mechanisms for embrittlement. However, a fracture prediction methodology that associates macroscopic parameters with the degradation mechanisms at the microscale has not been established, as of yet. In this article, we report recent work on modeling and simulation of hydrogen-induced crack initiation and growth. Our goal is to develop methodologies to relate characteristics of the degradation mechanisms from microscopic observations and first-principles calculations with macroscopic indices of embrittlement. The approach we use involves finite element analysis of the coupled hydrogen transport problem with hydrogen-assisted elastoplastic deformation, thermodynamic theories of decohesion, and ab initio density functional theory calculations of the hydrogen effect on grain boundaries.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77949595276&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77949595276&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/adma.200904354

DO - 10.1002/adma.200904354

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 1128

EP - 1135

JO - Advanced Materials

JF - Advanced Materials

SN - 0935-9648

IS - 10

ER -