Reductive evolution of bacterial genome in insect gut environment

Naruo Nikoh, Takahiro Hosokawa, Kenshiro Oshima, Masahira Hattori, Takema Fukatsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obligate endocellular symbiotic bacteria of insects and other organisms generally exhibit drastic genome reduction. Recently, it was shown that symbiotic gut bacteria of some stinkbugs also have remarkably reduced genomes. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of such a gut bacterium Ishikawaella capsulata of the plataspid stinkbug Megacopta punctatissima. Gene repertoire and evolutionary patterns, including AT richness and elevated evolutionary rate, of the 745,590 bp genome were strikingly similar to those of obligate c-proteobacterial endocellular insect symbionts like Buchnera in aphids and Wigglesworthia in tsetse flies. Ishikawaella was suggested to supply essential amino acids for the plant-sucking stinkbug as Buchnera does for the host aphid. Although Buchnera is phylogenetically closer to Wigglesworthia than to Ishikawaella, in terms of gene repertoire Buchnera was similar to Ishikawaella rather than to Wigglesworthia, providing a possible case of genome-level convergence of gene content. Meanwhile, several notable differences were identified between the genomes of Ishikawaella and Buchnera, including retention of TCA cycle genes and lack of flagellum-related genes in Ishikawaella, which may reflect their adaptation to distinct symbiotic habitats. Unexpectedly, Ishikawaella retained fewer genes related to cell wall synthesis and lipid metabolism than many endocellular insect symbionts. The plasmid of Ishikawaella encoded genes for arginine metabolism and oxalate detoxification, suggesting the possibility of additional Ishikawaella roles similar to those of human gut bacteria. Our data highlight strikingly similar evolutionary patterns that are shared between the extracellular and endocellular insect symbiont genomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)702-714
Number of pages13
JournalGenome Biology and Evolution
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bacterial Genomes
Buchnera
Buchnera (Proteobacteria)
Insects
Wigglesworthia
genome
digestive system
insect
insects
Genome
gene
Genes
symbiont
symbionts
genes
Bacteria
Aphids
bacterium
bacteria
aphid

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics

Cite this

Reductive evolution of bacterial genome in insect gut environment. / Nikoh, Naruo; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Fukatsu, Takema.

In: Genome Biology and Evolution, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.12.2011, p. 702-714.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nikoh, Naruo ; Hosokawa, Takahiro ; Oshima, Kenshiro ; Hattori, Masahira ; Fukatsu, Takema. / Reductive evolution of bacterial genome in insect gut environment. In: Genome Biology and Evolution. 2011 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 702-714.
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