Regional venous outflow, blood volume, and sympathetic nerve activity during severe hypoxia

Sumio Hoka, Z. J. Bosnjak, H. Arimura, J. P. Kampine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the dynamic changes in venous outflow from the splanchnic, coronary, and remaining other vascular beds and changes in systemic blood volume (SBV) in response to severe hypoxia (PO2 = 17 mmHg) in dogs using cardiopulmonary bypass and a reservoir. Splanchnic venous outflow, which also includes renal outflow in this study, decreased by 40%, and coronary venous outflow increased by 400% at 3.5 min after initiating severe hypoxia. Severe hypoxia caused a marked decrease in SBV of 23 ± 1 and 9 ± 2 ml/kg in spleen-intact and splenectomized dogs, respectively. The decrease in SBV was attenuated by 60 (P < 0.01) and 83% (P < 0.01) after the carotid and aortic chemoreceptor denervation (which was accompanied by baroreceptor denervation) and after hexamethonium infusion (10 mg/kg), respectively. Sympathetic efferent nerve activity revealed a tremendous augmentation, which began to rise at a PO2 of 40 mmHg before chemoreceptor denervation and at a PO2 of 22 mmHg after denervation. These results show that severe hypoxia causes a marked decrease in SBV, 60% of which is caused by active splenic contraction, and suggests that the sympathetic efferent nerve activity, which is augmented by the stimulation of chemoreceptors as well as the central nervous system, contributes greatly to those hypoxic changes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume256
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1989

Fingerprint

Denervation
Blood Volume
Viscera
Dogs
Hexamethonium
Pressoreceptors
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Blood Vessels
Spleen
Central Nervous System
Kidney
Hypoxia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Regional venous outflow, blood volume, and sympathetic nerve activity during severe hypoxia. / Hoka, Sumio; Bosnjak, Z. J.; Arimura, H.; Kampine, J. P.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 256, No. 1, 01.01.1989.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{22c0b1e2e2e04269bfbb7a220125e7df,
title = "Regional venous outflow, blood volume, and sympathetic nerve activity during severe hypoxia",
abstract = "We examined the dynamic changes in venous outflow from the splanchnic, coronary, and remaining other vascular beds and changes in systemic blood volume (SBV) in response to severe hypoxia (PO2 = 17 mmHg) in dogs using cardiopulmonary bypass and a reservoir. Splanchnic venous outflow, which also includes renal outflow in this study, decreased by 40{\%}, and coronary venous outflow increased by 400{\%} at 3.5 min after initiating severe hypoxia. Severe hypoxia caused a marked decrease in SBV of 23 ± 1 and 9 ± 2 ml/kg in spleen-intact and splenectomized dogs, respectively. The decrease in SBV was attenuated by 60 (P < 0.01) and 83{\%} (P < 0.01) after the carotid and aortic chemoreceptor denervation (which was accompanied by baroreceptor denervation) and after hexamethonium infusion (10 mg/kg), respectively. Sympathetic efferent nerve activity revealed a tremendous augmentation, which began to rise at a PO2 of 40 mmHg before chemoreceptor denervation and at a PO2 of 22 mmHg after denervation. These results show that severe hypoxia causes a marked decrease in SBV, 60{\%} of which is caused by active splenic contraction, and suggests that the sympathetic efferent nerve activity, which is augmented by the stimulation of chemoreceptors as well as the central nervous system, contributes greatly to those hypoxic changes.",
author = "Sumio Hoka and Bosnjak, {Z. J.} and H. Arimura and Kampine, {J. P.}",
year = "1989",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "256",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0363-6135",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Regional venous outflow, blood volume, and sympathetic nerve activity during severe hypoxia

AU - Hoka, Sumio

AU - Bosnjak, Z. J.

AU - Arimura, H.

AU - Kampine, J. P.

PY - 1989/1/1

Y1 - 1989/1/1

N2 - We examined the dynamic changes in venous outflow from the splanchnic, coronary, and remaining other vascular beds and changes in systemic blood volume (SBV) in response to severe hypoxia (PO2 = 17 mmHg) in dogs using cardiopulmonary bypass and a reservoir. Splanchnic venous outflow, which also includes renal outflow in this study, decreased by 40%, and coronary venous outflow increased by 400% at 3.5 min after initiating severe hypoxia. Severe hypoxia caused a marked decrease in SBV of 23 ± 1 and 9 ± 2 ml/kg in spleen-intact and splenectomized dogs, respectively. The decrease in SBV was attenuated by 60 (P < 0.01) and 83% (P < 0.01) after the carotid and aortic chemoreceptor denervation (which was accompanied by baroreceptor denervation) and after hexamethonium infusion (10 mg/kg), respectively. Sympathetic efferent nerve activity revealed a tremendous augmentation, which began to rise at a PO2 of 40 mmHg before chemoreceptor denervation and at a PO2 of 22 mmHg after denervation. These results show that severe hypoxia causes a marked decrease in SBV, 60% of which is caused by active splenic contraction, and suggests that the sympathetic efferent nerve activity, which is augmented by the stimulation of chemoreceptors as well as the central nervous system, contributes greatly to those hypoxic changes.

AB - We examined the dynamic changes in venous outflow from the splanchnic, coronary, and remaining other vascular beds and changes in systemic blood volume (SBV) in response to severe hypoxia (PO2 = 17 mmHg) in dogs using cardiopulmonary bypass and a reservoir. Splanchnic venous outflow, which also includes renal outflow in this study, decreased by 40%, and coronary venous outflow increased by 400% at 3.5 min after initiating severe hypoxia. Severe hypoxia caused a marked decrease in SBV of 23 ± 1 and 9 ± 2 ml/kg in spleen-intact and splenectomized dogs, respectively. The decrease in SBV was attenuated by 60 (P < 0.01) and 83% (P < 0.01) after the carotid and aortic chemoreceptor denervation (which was accompanied by baroreceptor denervation) and after hexamethonium infusion (10 mg/kg), respectively. Sympathetic efferent nerve activity revealed a tremendous augmentation, which began to rise at a PO2 of 40 mmHg before chemoreceptor denervation and at a PO2 of 22 mmHg after denervation. These results show that severe hypoxia causes a marked decrease in SBV, 60% of which is caused by active splenic contraction, and suggests that the sympathetic efferent nerve activity, which is augmented by the stimulation of chemoreceptors as well as the central nervous system, contributes greatly to those hypoxic changes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024509365&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024509365&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 256

JO - American Journal of Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology

SN - 0363-6135

IS - 1

ER -