Regulation of host stress response by gut microbiota

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Gut microbiota have several beneficial effects on host physiological functions ; however, little is known about whether or not such microbes can affect the development of brain plasticity and a subsequent central nervous system response. Recently, accumulating evidence has shown that gut microbiota can affect host stress response and behavioral phenotype. Our previous works using gnotobiotic mice demonstrated that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal reaction to restraint stress was substantially higher in germ-free (GF) mice than in specific pathogen free (SPF) mice. Moreover, GF mice were more active and anxious than EX-GF mice of which microbiota had been reconstituted with normal SPF microbiota. These results thus support the idea that gut microbes affect postnatal development of host stress response and behavioral phenotype.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-41
Number of pages5
JournalSkin Research
Volume12
Issue numberSUPPL. 20
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2013

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Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
Microbiota
Germ-Free Life
Phenotype
Central Nervous System
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Regulation of host stress response by gut microbiota. / Sudo, Nobuyuki.

In: Skin Research, Vol. 12, No. SUPPL. 20, 01.10.2013, p. 37-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sudo, Nobuyuki. / Regulation of host stress response by gut microbiota. In: Skin Research. 2013 ; Vol. 12, No. SUPPL. 20. pp. 37-41.
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