Relationship among Establishment Durations, Kin Relatedness, Aggressiveness, and Distance between Populations of Eight Invasive Argentine Ant (Hymenoptera

Formicidae) Supercolonies in Japan

K. Sato, H. Sakamoto, M. Hirata, M. Kidokoro-Kobayashi, M. Ozaki, S. Higashi, Takahiro Murakami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated kin relatedness and kin-recognition abilities of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), an invader from North America that has pervaded Japan for 20 yr, using genetic analyses and behavioral bioassays. From these data and interactions among factors, we formulated an eradication and management time-scale pattern diagram. Relatedness within a colony using microsatellite markers was effectively zero, whereas relatedness estimated by multilocus DNA fingerprinting markers was relatively high. Specifically, relatedness of recently invaded populations was estimated at nearly 0.3. From the results of behavioral bioassays on the invading populations of the Argentine ant, all colonies except the Kobe supercolonies did not show clearly aggressive behaviors toward workers belonging to other colonies, even when distantly located. Because they are critical factors for eradicating and managing invasive organisms, we assessed the relationships among kin relatedness using multilocus DNA fingerprinting and microsatellite markers, with aggressiveness, in 2011 and 2012, including the establishment durations, and distances among supercolonies. A generalized linear model (GLM) analysis, with establishment durations as an explanatory variable, strongly contributed to explaining estimated relatedness from the two methods. Specifically, models using kin relatedness for both multilocus DNA fingerprinting and microsatellite markers provided the strongest contribution to explaining the establishment durations. Within 3 yr after establishment in a native area, eradication is possible because of their low genetic diversity and small colony size. After 15 yr, eradication will be more difficult, but it is preferable to just monitor the impact for a nonnative ecosystem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1676-1684
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Economic Entomology
Volume110
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2017

Fingerprint

Linepithema humile
aggression
DNA fingerprinting
relatedness
ant
Formicidae
Hymenoptera
microsatellite repeats
Japan
duration
bioassays
time management
kin recognition
linear models
bioassay
genetic variation
ecosystems
monitoring
organisms
diagram

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Insect Science

Cite this

Relationship among Establishment Durations, Kin Relatedness, Aggressiveness, and Distance between Populations of Eight Invasive Argentine Ant (Hymenoptera : Formicidae) Supercolonies in Japan. / Sato, K.; Sakamoto, H.; Hirata, M.; Kidokoro-Kobayashi, M.; Ozaki, M.; Higashi, S.; Murakami, Takahiro.

In: Journal of Economic Entomology, Vol. 110, No. 4, 01.08.2017, p. 1676-1684.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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