Relationship between maximum oxygen uptake and peripheral vasoconstriction in a cold environment

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Abstract

Background: Various individual characteristics affect environmental adaptability of a human. The present study evaluates the relationship between physical fitness and peripheral vasoconstriction in a cold environment. Methods: Seven healthy male students (aged 22.0 years) participated in this study. Cold exposure tests consisted of supine rest for 60 min at 28 °C followed by 90 min at 10 °C. Rectal and skin temperatures at seven sites, oxygen consumption, and the diameter of a finger vein were measured during the experiment. Metabolic heat production, skin heat conductance, and the rate of vasoconstriction were calculated. Individual maximum oxygen consumption, a direct index of aerobic fitness, was measured on the day following the cold exposure test. Results: Decreases in temperature of the hand negatively correlated with the changes in rectal temperature. Maximum oxygen consumption and the rate of vasoconstriction are positively correlated. Furthermore, pairs of the following three factors are also significantly correlated: rate of metabolic heat production, skin heat conductance, and the rate of vasoconstriction. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested that the capacity for peripheral vasoconstriction can be improved by physical exercise. Furthermore, when exposed to a cold environment, fitter individuals could maintain metabolic heat production at the resting metabolic level of a thermoneutral condition, as they correspondingly lost less heat.

Original languageEnglish
Article number42
JournalJournal of physiological anthropology
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2017

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Vasoconstriction
heat
Thermogenesis
Oxygen
Oxygen Consumption
Hot Temperature
Skin
fitness
Temperature
Physical Fitness
Skin Temperature
physical exercise
Fingers
Veins
Hand
Exercise
Students
experiment
student
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Anthropology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Various individual characteristics affect environmental adaptability of a human. The present study evaluates the relationship between physical fitness and peripheral vasoconstriction in a cold environment. Methods: Seven healthy male students (aged 22.0 years) participated in this study. Cold exposure tests consisted of supine rest for 60 min at 28 °C followed by 90 min at 10 °C. Rectal and skin temperatures at seven sites, oxygen consumption, and the diameter of a finger vein were measured during the experiment. Metabolic heat production, skin heat conductance, and the rate of vasoconstriction were calculated. Individual maximum oxygen consumption, a direct index of aerobic fitness, was measured on the day following the cold exposure test. Results: Decreases in temperature of the hand negatively correlated with the changes in rectal temperature. Maximum oxygen consumption and the rate of vasoconstriction are positively correlated. Furthermore, pairs of the following three factors are also significantly correlated: rate of metabolic heat production, skin heat conductance, and the rate of vasoconstriction. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested that the capacity for peripheral vasoconstriction can be improved by physical exercise. Furthermore, when exposed to a cold environment, fitter individuals could maintain metabolic heat production at the resting metabolic level of a thermoneutral condition, as they correspondingly lost less heat.",
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