Relationship of toothbrushing to metabolic syndrome in middle-aged adults

Akihiko Tanaka, Kenji Takeuchi, Michiko Furuta, Toru Takeshita, Shino Suma, Takashi Shinagawa, Yoshihiro Shimazaki, Yoshihisa Yamashita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To examine the effect of toothbrushing on the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), including assessment of periodontal status, in middle-aged adults. Methods: This 5-year follow-up retrospective study was performed in 3,722 participants (2,897 males and 825 females) aged 35–64 years who underwent both medical check-ups and dental examinations. Metabolic components included obesity, elevated triglycerides, blood pressure, fasting glucose and reduced high-density lipoprotein. Toothbrushing frequency was assessed using a questionnaire. Periodontal disease was defined as having at least one site with a pocket depth of ≥4 mm. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between toothbrushing frequency at the baseline examination and the development of MetS (≥3 components). Results: During follow-up, 11.1% of participants developed MetS. After adjusting for potential confounders including periodontal disease, participants with more frequent daily toothbrushing tended to have significantly lower odds of developing MetS (p for trend =.01). The risk of development of MetS was significantly lower in participants brushing teeth ≥3 times/day than in those brushing teeth ≤1 time/day (odds ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval = 0.45–0.92). Conclusions: Frequent daily toothbrushing was associated with lower risk of development of MetS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)538-547
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Periodontology
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

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Toothbrushing
Tooth
Periodontal Diseases
HDL Lipoproteins
Fasting
Triglycerides
Retrospective Studies
Obesity
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Confidence Intervals
Blood Pressure
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Periodontics

Cite this

Relationship of toothbrushing to metabolic syndrome in middle-aged adults. / Tanaka, Akihiko; Takeuchi, Kenji; Furuta, Michiko; Takeshita, Toru; Suma, Shino; Shinagawa, Takashi; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Yoshihisa.

In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Vol. 45, No. 5, 05.2018, p. 538-547.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tanaka, Akihiko ; Takeuchi, Kenji ; Furuta, Michiko ; Takeshita, Toru ; Suma, Shino ; Shinagawa, Takashi ; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro ; Yamashita, Yoshihisa. / Relationship of toothbrushing to metabolic syndrome in middle-aged adults. In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology. 2018 ; Vol. 45, No. 5. pp. 538-547.
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