Relationships among fine roots, fungal hyphae and soil microarthropods among different soil microhabitats in a temperate coniferous forest of Chamaecyparis obtusa

Takuo Hishi, Reiji Fujimaki, Terence P. McGonigle, Hiroshi Takeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationships between roots and soil communities are not well understood. We used the ingrowth-core method with L-, FH-, and M-layer substrates to investigate the relationships among soil organic carbon, fine root biomass, hyphal length and the numbers of soil microarthropods. The study was carried out in a temperate forest of the arbuscular mycorrhizal conifer, Chamaecyparis obtusa. The relationships among fine roots, fungi and soil microarthropods were different among soil substrates and faunal taxa. Soil carbon contents, fine root biomass, hyphal length and soil-microarthropod numbers were the highest in the FH-substrate, and the lowest in the M-substrate. For each substrate, the total numbers of soil microarthropods did not positively correlated with soil organic carbon. A positive correlation between fine root biomass and the soil microarthropod numbers was significant only in the M-substrate, but not in the L- and FH-substrates. In M-substrates, strong positive correlations were found between fine root biomass or hyphal length and Mesostigmata or Oribatida numbers, but Collembola numbers were not corelated. Further studies of the regulation mechanism of soil food web structures should note that the soil microarthropods have different responses to C sources according to soil conditions and trophic interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)473-477
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Soil Biology
Volume44
Issue number5-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Soil Science
  • Insect Science

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