Relationships of accelerometer-determined physical activity with obesity, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and health-related quality of life in patients after liver transplantation

Satomi Tanaka, Kimie Fujita, Kiyoko Makimoto, Maki Kanaoka, Kanako Yakushiji, Rumi Tanaka, Noboru Harada, Tomoharu Yoshizumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The contribution of physical activity (PA) to the prevention of metabolic abnormalities following liver transplantation (LT) has not been well documented. We aimed to assess PA in post-LT patients and to quantify its relationships with the development of postoperative metabolic abnormalities and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). We recruited 111 patients who had undergone LT ≥ 6 months previously. PA was measured by accelerometry, and HRQOL was evaluated using SF-8. PA was quantified as the number of steps per day, and the time spent performing moderate-to-vigorous PA and light PA per week. The prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia increased more than twofold following LT. The proportion of the participants with a sedentary lifestyle (<5000 steps/day) was 36%. Logistic regression analysis showed that postoperative hypertension and obesity were associated with preoperative body mass index and the number of steps taken (in 2000 steps/day increments). Preoperative diabetes was associated with obesity, and PA was associated with physical function-related HRQOL scores. Thus, increasing the number of steps taken per day has the potential to reduce hypertension and obesity, and PA could improve physical function-related HRQOL in patients following LT.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere14117
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume34
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

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