Relative role of flower color and scent on pollinator attraction: Experimental tests using F1 and F2 hybrids of daylily and nightlily

Shun K. Hirota, Kozue Nitta, Yuni Kim, Aya Kato, Nobumitsu Kawakubo, Akiko A. Yasumoto, Tetsukazu Yahara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The daylily (Hemerocallis fulva) and nightlily (H. citrina) are typical examples of a butterfly-pollination system and a hawkmoth-pollination system, respectively. H. fulva has diurnal, reddish or orange-colored flowers and is mainly pollinated by diurnal swallowtail butterflies. H. citrina has nocturnal, yellowish flowers with a sweet fragrance and is pollinated by nocturnal hawkmoths. We evaluated the relative roles of flower color and scent on the evolutionary shift from a diurnally flowering ancestor to H. citrina. We conducted a series of experiments that mimic situations in which mutants differing in either flower color, floral scent or both appeared in a diurnally flowering population. An experimental array of 6×6 potted plants, mixed with 24 plants of H. fulva and 12 plants of either F1 or F2 hybrids, were placed in the field, and visitations of swallowtail butterflies and nocturnal hawkmoths were recorded with camcorders. Swallowtail butterflies preferentially visited reddish or orange-colored flowers and hawkmoths preferentially visited yellowish flowers. Neither swallowtail butterflies nor nocturnal hawkmoths showed significant preferences for overall scent emission. Our results suggest that mutations in flower color would be more relevant to the adaptive shift from a diurnally flowering ancestor to H. citrina than that in floral scent.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere39010
JournalPloS one
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 15 2012

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Hemerocallis
pollinating insects
Butterflies
Color
odors
Papilionidae
Hemerocallis fulva
flowers
color
Fragrances
testing
Pollination
Video cameras
flowering
pollination
ancestry
container-grown plants
butterflies
Experiments
mutation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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Relative role of flower color and scent on pollinator attraction : Experimental tests using F1 and F2 hybrids of daylily and nightlily. / Hirota, Shun K.; Nitta, Kozue; Kim, Yuni; Kato, Aya; Kawakubo, Nobumitsu; Yasumoto, Akiko A.; Yahara, Tetsukazu.

In: PloS one, Vol. 7, No. 6, e39010, 15.06.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirota, Shun K. ; Nitta, Kozue ; Kim, Yuni ; Kato, Aya ; Kawakubo, Nobumitsu ; Yasumoto, Akiko A. ; Yahara, Tetsukazu. / Relative role of flower color and scent on pollinator attraction : Experimental tests using F1 and F2 hybrids of daylily and nightlily. In: PloS one. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 6.
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