Remote transmission of live endoscopy over the Internet: Report from the 87th Congress of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society

Shuji Shimizu, Takao Ohtsuka, Shunichi Takahata, Eishi Nagai, Naoki Nakashima, Masao Tanaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Live demonstration of endoscopy is one of the most attractive and useful methods for education and is often organized locally in hospitals. However, problems have been apparent in terms of cost, preparation, and potential risks to patients. Our aim was to evaluate a new approach to live endoscopy whereby remote hospitals are connected by the Internet for live endoscopic demonstrations. Live endoscopy was transmitted to the Congress of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopic Society by 13 domestic and international hospitals. Patients with upper and lower gastrointestinal diseases and with pancreatobiliary disorders were the subjects of a live demonstration. Questionnaires were distributed to the audience and were sent to the demonstrators. Questions concerned the quality of transmitted images and sound, cost, preparations, programs, preference of style, and adverse events. Of the audience, 91.2% (249/273) answered favorably regarding the transmitted image quality and 93.8% (259/276) regarding the sound quality. All demonstrators answered favorably regarding image quality and 93% (13/14) regarding sound quality. Preparations were completed without any outsourcing at 11 sites (79%) and were evaluated as 'very easy' or 'easy' at all but one site (92.3%). Preparation cost was judged as 'very cheap' or 'cheap' at 12 sites (86%). Live endoscopy connecting multiple international centers was satisfactory in image and sound quality for both audience and demonstrators, with easy and inexpensive preparation. The remote transmission of live endoscopy from demonstrators' own hospitals was preferred to the conventional style of locally organized live endoscopy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-97
Number of pages6
JournalDigestive Endoscopy
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016

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Internet
Endoscopy
Costs and Cost Analysis
Outsourced Services
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Japan
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Remote transmission of live endoscopy over the Internet : Report from the 87th Congress of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society. / Shimizu, Shuji; Ohtsuka, Takao; Takahata, Shunichi; Nagai, Eishi; Nakashima, Naoki; Tanaka, Masao.

In: Digestive Endoscopy, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 92-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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