Responses to worm-like-wriggling models by the praying mantis: Effects of amount of motion on prey recognition

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Abstract

Adult females of the mantis, Tenodera angustipennis, were presented with a wriggling model, consisting of six circular spots positioned in a row horizontally and adjacently. During presentation, this model wriggled like a worm by moving some spots. When the motion of the model was small (the number of moving spots ≤2), the mantis sometimes stalked the model with peering movements but seldom struck it. When the motion was large (the number of moving spots ≥3), the mantis frequently fixated, rapidly approached, and struck the model. These results suggest that the mantis changes its approach behavior depending on the amount of prey motion. Disappearance of some terminal spots at the stationary end hardly affected the rates of fixation, peering, and strike. The model that wriggled at each end elicited lower rates of fixation and strike than the model that wriggled at one end. These results suggest that the mantis responds to only the fastest moving part of the wriggling model when the motion of the model is large.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-129
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Ethology
Volume21
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2003

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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