Roles of shape and size of component crystals in semiconductor gas sensors: II. Response to N O2 and H2

Noboru Yamazoe, Kengo Shimanoe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The theoretical approach established on the response of semiconductor gas sensors to oxygen was extended to the response to N O2 (oxidizing gas) or H2 and CO (reducing gases) in air. The former extension was carried out simply by replacing the reduced adsorptive strength of oxygen by that of N O2. The resulting equations were found to well explain the N O2 sensing behavior of the devices using granular or lamellar crystals of W O3. The latter extension was carried out through a steady-state method; that is, the steady concentration of adsorbed oxygen (O-) was combined with the electronic equilibrium of the constituent crystals underneath to formulate the sensor response as a function of the partial pressure of each reducing gas. It was confirmed that the theory could account for the grain size effects and doping effect reported for Sn O2 -based devices fairly well.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the Electrochemical Society
Volume155
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 14 2008

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Chemical sensors
Gases
Semiconductor materials
Oxygen
Crystals
sensors
gases
crystals
oxygen
Carbon Monoxide
Partial pressure
Doping (additives)
partial pressure
grain size
Sensors
Air
air
electronics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Electrochemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

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AB - The theoretical approach established on the response of semiconductor gas sensors to oxygen was extended to the response to N O2 (oxidizing gas) or H2 and CO (reducing gases) in air. The former extension was carried out simply by replacing the reduced adsorptive strength of oxygen by that of N O2. The resulting equations were found to well explain the N O2 sensing behavior of the devices using granular or lamellar crystals of W O3. The latter extension was carried out through a steady-state method; that is, the steady concentration of adsorbed oxygen (O-) was combined with the electronic equilibrium of the constituent crystals underneath to formulate the sensor response as a function of the partial pressure of each reducing gas. It was confirmed that the theory could account for the grain size effects and doping effect reported for Sn O2 -based devices fairly well.

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