Roles of the jejunum and ileum in the first-pass effect as absorptive barriers for orally administered tacrolimus

Masahiro Shimomura, Satohiro Masuda, Hideyuki Saito, Seisuke Sakamoto, Shinji Uemoto, Koichi Tanaka, Ken Ichi Inui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The immunosuppressant tacrolimus shows poor and variable bioavailability following oral administration in clinical use. Recently, the hepatic and intestinal metabolisms, or first-pass effect, of tacrolimus have been suggested to be responsible for its bioavailability. In the present study, we investigated the respective contribution of the jejunum and ileum to the first-pass effect of tacrolimus in rats. Methods. The metabolism of tacrolimus in everted sacs of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum was examined. Tacrolimus was administered intravenously or intraintestinally to sham-operated, jejunum-resected, or ileum-resected rats. Blood samples were collected over a 240-min period, and whole-blood tacrolimus concentrations were measured by semiautomated microparticle enzyme immunoassay. The pharmacokinetic parameters of tacrolimus in each group were estimated. Results. The metabolic activity of tacrolimus appeared to be the highest in the everted sacs of the duodenum. The bioavailability of tacrolimus in the jejunum- or ileum-resected rats was higher than that in sham-operated controls. On the other hand, the time to peak concentration in the jejunum-resected rats was about twofold slower than those in ileum-resected and sham-operated rats. Conclusions. These results suggested that the first-pass effect of tacrolimus in the small intestine shows regional differences and the extraction of tacrolimus in the small intestine consists of the amount of extraction in the jejunum and ileum. In addition, the ileum rather than the jejunum as a graft of segmental small bowel transplantation would be useful to avoid the adverse effects of tacrolimus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-222
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume103
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tacrolimus
Jejunum
Ileum
Biological Availability
Duodenum
Small Intestine
Immunosuppressive Agents
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Oral Administration
Pharmacokinetics
Transplantation
Transplants

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Roles of the jejunum and ileum in the first-pass effect as absorptive barriers for orally administered tacrolimus. / Shimomura, Masahiro; Masuda, Satohiro; Saito, Hideyuki; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Uemoto, Shinji; Tanaka, Koichi; Inui, Ken Ichi.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 103, No. 2, 01.01.2002, p. 215-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shimomura, Masahiro ; Masuda, Satohiro ; Saito, Hideyuki ; Sakamoto, Seisuke ; Uemoto, Shinji ; Tanaka, Koichi ; Inui, Ken Ichi. / Roles of the jejunum and ileum in the first-pass effect as absorptive barriers for orally administered tacrolimus. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2002 ; Vol. 103, No. 2. pp. 215-222.
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abstract = "Background. The immunosuppressant tacrolimus shows poor and variable bioavailability following oral administration in clinical use. Recently, the hepatic and intestinal metabolisms, or first-pass effect, of tacrolimus have been suggested to be responsible for its bioavailability. In the present study, we investigated the respective contribution of the jejunum and ileum to the first-pass effect of tacrolimus in rats. Methods. The metabolism of tacrolimus in everted sacs of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum was examined. Tacrolimus was administered intravenously or intraintestinally to sham-operated, jejunum-resected, or ileum-resected rats. Blood samples were collected over a 240-min period, and whole-blood tacrolimus concentrations were measured by semiautomated microparticle enzyme immunoassay. The pharmacokinetic parameters of tacrolimus in each group were estimated. Results. The metabolic activity of tacrolimus appeared to be the highest in the everted sacs of the duodenum. The bioavailability of tacrolimus in the jejunum- or ileum-resected rats was higher than that in sham-operated controls. On the other hand, the time to peak concentration in the jejunum-resected rats was about twofold slower than those in ileum-resected and sham-operated rats. Conclusions. These results suggested that the first-pass effect of tacrolimus in the small intestine shows regional differences and the extraction of tacrolimus in the small intestine consists of the amount of extraction in the jejunum and ileum. In addition, the ileum rather than the jejunum as a graft of segmental small bowel transplantation would be useful to avoid the adverse effects of tacrolimus.",
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