Salt intake, home blood pressure, and perinatal outcome in pregnant women

Minako Inoue, Takuya Tsuchihashi, Yasuyuki Hasuo, Masanobu Ogawa, Mitsuhiro Tominaga, Kimika Arakawa, Emi Oishi, Satoko Sakata, Toshio Ohtsubo, Kiyoshi Matsumura, Takanari Kitazono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The relationship between salt (sodium chloride) intake and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) remains unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the current status of salt intake during pregnancy and identify effective predictors for PIH. Methods and Results: Participants were 184 pregnant women who collected 24-h home urine as well as early morning urine samples. We investigated urinary salt excretion, home blood pressure (HBP) measurements for 7 consecutive days before the 20th and after the 30th gestational week, and the development of PIH. Urinary salt excretion according to early morning urine before the 20th gestational week was 8.6±1.7 g/day, and was significantly correlated with that measured from 24-h collected urine. Early morning urine estimated urinary salt excretion was slightly but significantly increased during pregnancy. HBP was 102±10/63±8 mmHg before the 20th gestational week and 104±12/64±10 mmHg after the 30th gestational week. On multiple regression analysis, serum uric acid and body mass index, but not urinary salt excretion, contributed to HBP both before the 20th and after the 30th gestational week. Fourteen participants (7.6%) developed PIH. On multivariate analysis, higher HBP and older age, but not urinary salt excretion, were significantly associated with PIH. Conclusions: Higher HBP and older age, but not urinary salt excretion, are predictors of PIH.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2165-2172
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation Journal
Volume80
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Pregnancy Induced Hypertension
Pregnant Women
Salts
Blood Pressure
Urine
Hypertension
Pregnancy
Uric Acid
Sodium Chloride
Body Mass Index
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Inoue, M., Tsuchihashi, T., Hasuo, Y., Ogawa, M., Tominaga, M., Arakawa, K., ... Kitazono, T. (2016). Salt intake, home blood pressure, and perinatal outcome in pregnant women. Circulation Journal, 80(10), 2165-2172. https://doi.org/10.1253/circj.CJ-16-0405

Salt intake, home blood pressure, and perinatal outcome in pregnant women. / Inoue, Minako; Tsuchihashi, Takuya; Hasuo, Yasuyuki; Ogawa, Masanobu; Tominaga, Mitsuhiro; Arakawa, Kimika; Oishi, Emi; Sakata, Satoko; Ohtsubo, Toshio; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Kitazono, Takanari.

In: Circulation Journal, Vol. 80, No. 10, 01.01.2016, p. 2165-2172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Inoue, M, Tsuchihashi, T, Hasuo, Y, Ogawa, M, Tominaga, M, Arakawa, K, Oishi, E, Sakata, S, Ohtsubo, T, Matsumura, K & Kitazono, T 2016, 'Salt intake, home blood pressure, and perinatal outcome in pregnant women', Circulation Journal, vol. 80, no. 10, pp. 2165-2172. https://doi.org/10.1253/circj.CJ-16-0405
Inoue M, Tsuchihashi T, Hasuo Y, Ogawa M, Tominaga M, Arakawa K et al. Salt intake, home blood pressure, and perinatal outcome in pregnant women. Circulation Journal. 2016 Jan 1;80(10):2165-2172. https://doi.org/10.1253/circj.CJ-16-0405
Inoue, Minako ; Tsuchihashi, Takuya ; Hasuo, Yasuyuki ; Ogawa, Masanobu ; Tominaga, Mitsuhiro ; Arakawa, Kimika ; Oishi, Emi ; Sakata, Satoko ; Ohtsubo, Toshio ; Matsumura, Kiyoshi ; Kitazono, Takanari. / Salt intake, home blood pressure, and perinatal outcome in pregnant women. In: Circulation Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 80, No. 10. pp. 2165-2172.
@article{e2bc205f18d447a0a43ee015d0a6be51,
title = "Salt intake, home blood pressure, and perinatal outcome in pregnant women",
abstract = "Background: The relationship between salt (sodium chloride) intake and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) remains unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the current status of salt intake during pregnancy and identify effective predictors for PIH. Methods and Results: Participants were 184 pregnant women who collected 24-h home urine as well as early morning urine samples. We investigated urinary salt excretion, home blood pressure (HBP) measurements for 7 consecutive days before the 20th and after the 30th gestational week, and the development of PIH. Urinary salt excretion according to early morning urine before the 20th gestational week was 8.6±1.7 g/day, and was significantly correlated with that measured from 24-h collected urine. Early morning urine estimated urinary salt excretion was slightly but significantly increased during pregnancy. HBP was 102±10/63±8 mmHg before the 20th gestational week and 104±12/64±10 mmHg after the 30th gestational week. On multiple regression analysis, serum uric acid and body mass index, but not urinary salt excretion, contributed to HBP both before the 20th and after the 30th gestational week. Fourteen participants (7.6{\%}) developed PIH. On multivariate analysis, higher HBP and older age, but not urinary salt excretion, were significantly associated with PIH. Conclusions: Higher HBP and older age, but not urinary salt excretion, are predictors of PIH.",
author = "Minako Inoue and Takuya Tsuchihashi and Yasuyuki Hasuo and Masanobu Ogawa and Mitsuhiro Tominaga and Kimika Arakawa and Emi Oishi and Satoko Sakata and Toshio Ohtsubo and Kiyoshi Matsumura and Takanari Kitazono",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1253/circj.CJ-16-0405",
language = "English",
volume = "80",
pages = "2165--2172",
journal = "Circulation Journal",
issn = "1346-9843",
publisher = "Japanese Circulation Society",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Salt intake, home blood pressure, and perinatal outcome in pregnant women

AU - Inoue, Minako

AU - Tsuchihashi, Takuya

AU - Hasuo, Yasuyuki

AU - Ogawa, Masanobu

AU - Tominaga, Mitsuhiro

AU - Arakawa, Kimika

AU - Oishi, Emi

AU - Sakata, Satoko

AU - Ohtsubo, Toshio

AU - Matsumura, Kiyoshi

AU - Kitazono, Takanari

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Background: The relationship between salt (sodium chloride) intake and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) remains unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the current status of salt intake during pregnancy and identify effective predictors for PIH. Methods and Results: Participants were 184 pregnant women who collected 24-h home urine as well as early morning urine samples. We investigated urinary salt excretion, home blood pressure (HBP) measurements for 7 consecutive days before the 20th and after the 30th gestational week, and the development of PIH. Urinary salt excretion according to early morning urine before the 20th gestational week was 8.6±1.7 g/day, and was significantly correlated with that measured from 24-h collected urine. Early morning urine estimated urinary salt excretion was slightly but significantly increased during pregnancy. HBP was 102±10/63±8 mmHg before the 20th gestational week and 104±12/64±10 mmHg after the 30th gestational week. On multiple regression analysis, serum uric acid and body mass index, but not urinary salt excretion, contributed to HBP both before the 20th and after the 30th gestational week. Fourteen participants (7.6%) developed PIH. On multivariate analysis, higher HBP and older age, but not urinary salt excretion, were significantly associated with PIH. Conclusions: Higher HBP and older age, but not urinary salt excretion, are predictors of PIH.

AB - Background: The relationship between salt (sodium chloride) intake and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) remains unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the current status of salt intake during pregnancy and identify effective predictors for PIH. Methods and Results: Participants were 184 pregnant women who collected 24-h home urine as well as early morning urine samples. We investigated urinary salt excretion, home blood pressure (HBP) measurements for 7 consecutive days before the 20th and after the 30th gestational week, and the development of PIH. Urinary salt excretion according to early morning urine before the 20th gestational week was 8.6±1.7 g/day, and was significantly correlated with that measured from 24-h collected urine. Early morning urine estimated urinary salt excretion was slightly but significantly increased during pregnancy. HBP was 102±10/63±8 mmHg before the 20th gestational week and 104±12/64±10 mmHg after the 30th gestational week. On multiple regression analysis, serum uric acid and body mass index, but not urinary salt excretion, contributed to HBP both before the 20th and after the 30th gestational week. Fourteen participants (7.6%) developed PIH. On multivariate analysis, higher HBP and older age, but not urinary salt excretion, were significantly associated with PIH. Conclusions: Higher HBP and older age, but not urinary salt excretion, are predictors of PIH.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84988602738&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84988602738&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1253/circj.CJ-16-0405

DO - 10.1253/circj.CJ-16-0405

M3 - Article

C2 - 27568849

AN - SCOPUS:84988602738

VL - 80

SP - 2165

EP - 2172

JO - Circulation Journal

JF - Circulation Journal

SN - 1346-9843

IS - 10

ER -