Salvage Splenic Artery Embolization for Saving Falling Living Donor Graft due to Portal Overflow: A Case Report

H. Okabe, T. Yoshizumi, T. Ikegami, H. Uchiyama, N. Harimoto, S. Itoh, K. Kimura, H. Baba, Y. Maehara

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Abstract

Portal decompression is an approach for reducing portal overflow caused by small-for-size syndrome. We report the case of a patient who recovered from rapidly progressing hyperbilirubinemia caused by a small graft by decompressing portal overflow with splenic artery embolization following a living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). The patient was a 54-year-old man with end-stage liver disease secondary to alcoholic liver cirrhosis; the donor was his 54-year-old wife. The graft volume of the left lobe was 444 mL, which was 34.8% of the standard liver volume (SLV) and insufficient for the recipient; thus, the plan was to use the right lobe for the graft. The patient underwent LDLT with a right lobe graft; the volume to SLV ratio was 39.1%, and the graft-to-recipient-weight ratio was 0.72%. Although portal pressure was low during the operation, the patient eventually developed small-for-size syndrome after LDLT. It was conceivable that because the patient had splenomegaly, portal decompression would be effective. Splenic arterial embolization was performed successfully on postoperative day (POD) 7. The patient's total bilirubin level was increased to 40 mg/dL on POD16. Decreased portal flow, which was shown by ultrasound screening to be “to-and-flo,” increased again on POD23 to one-third of that on POD1. He was discharged without any infectious complications. Additional splenic artery embolization after LDLT may be a convenient option for reducing portal overflow for patients with splenomegaly if the portal decompression was not performed for some reason at the surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3171-3173
Number of pages3
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume48
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2016

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

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