Senior thai fecal microbiota comparison between vegetarians and non-vegetarians using PCR-DGGE and real-time PCR

Supatjaree Ruengsomwong, Yuki Korenori, Naoshige Sakamoto, Bhusita Wannissorn, Jiro Nakayama, Sunee Nitisinprasert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The fecal microbiotas were investigated in 13 healthy Thai subjects using polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Among the 186 DNA bands detected on the polyacrylamide gel, 37 bands were identified as representing 11 species: Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides ovatus, Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides vulgatus, Clostridium colicanis, Eubacterium eligenes, E. rectale, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Megamonas funiformis, Prevotella copri, and Roseburia intestinalis, belonging mainly to the groups of Bacteroides, Prevotella, Clostridium, and F. prausnitzii. A dendrogram of the PCR-DGGE divided the subjects; vegetarians and non-vegetarians. The fecal microbiotas were also analyzed using a quantitative real-time PCR focused on Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, Clostrium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale, C. leptum, Lactobacillus, and Prevotella. The nonvegetarian and vegetarian subjects were found to have significant differences in the high abundance of the Bacteroides and Prevotella genera, respectively. No significant differences were found in the counts of Bifidabacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, C. coccoides-E. rectale group, C. leptum group, and Lactobacillus. Therefore, these findings on the microbiota of healthy Thais consuming different diets could provide helpful data for predicting the health of South East Asians with similar diets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1026-1033
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 18 2014

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Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis
Bacteroides
Microbiota
Prevotella
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Eubacterium
Clostridium
Lactobacillus
Enterobacteriaceae
Diet
Bifidobacterium
Vegetarians
Healthy Volunteers
DNA
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Senior thai fecal microbiota comparison between vegetarians and non-vegetarians using PCR-DGGE and real-time PCR. / Ruengsomwong, Supatjaree; Korenori, Yuki; Sakamoto, Naoshige; Wannissorn, Bhusita; Nakayama, Jiro; Nitisinprasert, Sunee.

In: Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Vol. 24, No. 8, 18.04.2014, p. 1026-1033.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ruengsomwong, Supatjaree ; Korenori, Yuki ; Sakamoto, Naoshige ; Wannissorn, Bhusita ; Nakayama, Jiro ; Nitisinprasert, Sunee. / Senior thai fecal microbiota comparison between vegetarians and non-vegetarians using PCR-DGGE and real-time PCR. In: Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 8. pp. 1026-1033.
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