Sensing necrotic cells

Yasunobu Miyake, Shou Yamasaki

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    48 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Multicellular organisms have developed ways to recognize potentially life-threatening events (danger signals). Classically, danger signals have been defined as exogenous, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as bacterial cell wall components (e.g., lipopolysaccharide and peptideglycan) or viral DNA/RNA. PAMPs interact with dedicated receptors on immune cells, so-called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and activate immune systems. A well-known family of PRRs is the toll-like receptors (TLRs) in which each member recognizes a specific set of PAMPs. However, not only exogenous pathogens but also several endogenous molecules released from necrotic cells (damaged self) also activate immune systems. These endogenous adjuvants are called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). It has been reported that high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), uric acid, heat shock proteins (HSPs) and nucleotides act as endogenous adjuvants. DAMPs are recognized by specific receptors (danger receptors) expressed mainly on antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells and macrophages and induce cell maturation and the production of inflammatory cytokines by activating the NF-kB pathway. In this chapter, we will review danger signals released from necrotic cells and its recognition receptors.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationSelf and Nonself
    Pages144-152
    Number of pages9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 23 2012

    Publication series

    NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
    Volume738
    ISSN (Print)0065-2598

    Fingerprint

    Pattern Recognition Receptors
    Immune system
    HMGB1 Protein
    Immune System
    NF-kappa B
    Macrophages
    Toll-Like Receptors
    Viral DNA
    Pathogens
    Heat-Shock Proteins
    Uric Acid
    Lipopolysaccharides
    Viral RNA
    Antigen-Presenting Cells
    Cellular Structures
    Nucleotides
    Cells
    RNA
    Dendritic Cells
    Cell Wall

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Medicine(all)
    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

    Cite this

    Miyake, Y., & Yamasaki, S. (2012). Sensing necrotic cells. In Self and Nonself (pp. 144-152). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 738). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1680-7_9

    Sensing necrotic cells. / Miyake, Yasunobu; Yamasaki, Shou.

    Self and Nonself. 2012. p. 144-152 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 738).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Miyake, Y & Yamasaki, S 2012, Sensing necrotic cells. in Self and Nonself. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 738, pp. 144-152. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1680-7_9
    Miyake Y, Yamasaki S. Sensing necrotic cells. In Self and Nonself. 2012. p. 144-152. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-1680-7_9
    Miyake, Yasunobu ; Yamasaki, Shou. / Sensing necrotic cells. Self and Nonself. 2012. pp. 144-152 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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