Serum asunaprevir and daclatasvir concentrations and outcomes in patients with recurrent hepatitis C who have undergone living donor liver transplantation

Noboru Harada, Tomoharu Yoshizumi, Toru Ikegami, Shinji Itoh, Norihiro Furusho, Masaki Kato, Shinji Shimoda, Takasuke Fukuhara, Yuji Soejima, Yoshihiko Maehara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aim: This study’s aim was to investigate the safety and effectiveness of asunaprevir and daclatasvir treatment for recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in transplant recipients. The study cohort comprised 14 transplant recipients with recurrent hepatitis C who were receiving asunaprevir and daclatasvir. Patients and Methods: Serum concentrations of asunaprevir and daclatasvir, their therapeutic effects, trough concentrations/dose ratios of tacrolimus, and adverse effects were evaluated. Results: Hepatitis C virus was still undetectable in 12 (85.7%) out of 14 patients 12 weeks after completing treatment. One week after starting treatment, asunaprevir concentrations were significantly higher in patients with baseline albumin concentrations ≤3.6 g/dl than in those with baseline albumin concentrations >3.6 g/dl. No marked fluctuations were identified in tacrolimus trough concentrations/dose ratios during the 24 weeks of therapy. Conclusion: Full doses of asunaprevir and daclatasvir-based treatment can be safely and effectively administered to liver transplant recipients for recurrent HCV genotype 1b after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) with little effect on blood concentrations of tacrolimus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5513-5520
Number of pages8
JournalAnticancer research
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

Fingerprint

Living Donors
Hepatitis C
Liver Transplantation
Tacrolimus
Hepacivirus
Serum
Albumins
Therapeutics
Therapeutic Uses
Virus Diseases
Cohort Studies
Genotype
BMS-790052
asunaprevir
Safety
Liver
Transplant Recipients

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

@article{8ab4db616f7c4e6998690c0cf79ef87c,
title = "Serum asunaprevir and daclatasvir concentrations and outcomes in patients with recurrent hepatitis C who have undergone living donor liver transplantation",
abstract = "Background/Aim: This study’s aim was to investigate the safety and effectiveness of asunaprevir and daclatasvir treatment for recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in transplant recipients. The study cohort comprised 14 transplant recipients with recurrent hepatitis C who were receiving asunaprevir and daclatasvir. Patients and Methods: Serum concentrations of asunaprevir and daclatasvir, their therapeutic effects, trough concentrations/dose ratios of tacrolimus, and adverse effects were evaluated. Results: Hepatitis C virus was still undetectable in 12 (85.7{\%}) out of 14 patients 12 weeks after completing treatment. One week after starting treatment, asunaprevir concentrations were significantly higher in patients with baseline albumin concentrations ≤3.6 g/dl than in those with baseline albumin concentrations >3.6 g/dl. No marked fluctuations were identified in tacrolimus trough concentrations/dose ratios during the 24 weeks of therapy. Conclusion: Full doses of asunaprevir and daclatasvir-based treatment can be safely and effectively administered to liver transplant recipients for recurrent HCV genotype 1b after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) with little effect on blood concentrations of tacrolimus.",
author = "Noboru Harada and Tomoharu Yoshizumi and Toru Ikegami and Shinji Itoh and Norihiro Furusho and Masaki Kato and Shinji Shimoda and Takasuke Fukuhara and Yuji Soejima and Yoshihiko Maehara",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
doi = "10.21873/anticanres.12885",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "5513--5520",
journal = "Anticancer Research",
issn = "0250-7005",
publisher = "International Institute of Anticancer Research",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Serum asunaprevir and daclatasvir concentrations and outcomes in patients with recurrent hepatitis C who have undergone living donor liver transplantation

AU - Harada, Noboru

AU - Yoshizumi, Tomoharu

AU - Ikegami, Toru

AU - Itoh, Shinji

AU - Furusho, Norihiro

AU - Kato, Masaki

AU - Shimoda, Shinji

AU - Fukuhara, Takasuke

AU - Soejima, Yuji

AU - Maehara, Yoshihiko

PY - 2018/9

Y1 - 2018/9

N2 - Background/Aim: This study’s aim was to investigate the safety and effectiveness of asunaprevir and daclatasvir treatment for recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in transplant recipients. The study cohort comprised 14 transplant recipients with recurrent hepatitis C who were receiving asunaprevir and daclatasvir. Patients and Methods: Serum concentrations of asunaprevir and daclatasvir, their therapeutic effects, trough concentrations/dose ratios of tacrolimus, and adverse effects were evaluated. Results: Hepatitis C virus was still undetectable in 12 (85.7%) out of 14 patients 12 weeks after completing treatment. One week after starting treatment, asunaprevir concentrations were significantly higher in patients with baseline albumin concentrations ≤3.6 g/dl than in those with baseline albumin concentrations >3.6 g/dl. No marked fluctuations were identified in tacrolimus trough concentrations/dose ratios during the 24 weeks of therapy. Conclusion: Full doses of asunaprevir and daclatasvir-based treatment can be safely and effectively administered to liver transplant recipients for recurrent HCV genotype 1b after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) with little effect on blood concentrations of tacrolimus.

AB - Background/Aim: This study’s aim was to investigate the safety and effectiveness of asunaprevir and daclatasvir treatment for recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in transplant recipients. The study cohort comprised 14 transplant recipients with recurrent hepatitis C who were receiving asunaprevir and daclatasvir. Patients and Methods: Serum concentrations of asunaprevir and daclatasvir, their therapeutic effects, trough concentrations/dose ratios of tacrolimus, and adverse effects were evaluated. Results: Hepatitis C virus was still undetectable in 12 (85.7%) out of 14 patients 12 weeks after completing treatment. One week after starting treatment, asunaprevir concentrations were significantly higher in patients with baseline albumin concentrations ≤3.6 g/dl than in those with baseline albumin concentrations >3.6 g/dl. No marked fluctuations were identified in tacrolimus trough concentrations/dose ratios during the 24 weeks of therapy. Conclusion: Full doses of asunaprevir and daclatasvir-based treatment can be safely and effectively administered to liver transplant recipients for recurrent HCV genotype 1b after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) with little effect on blood concentrations of tacrolimus.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053006814&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053006814&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.21873/anticanres.12885

DO - 10.21873/anticanres.12885

M3 - Article

C2 - 30194210

AN - SCOPUS:85053006814

VL - 38

SP - 5513

EP - 5520

JO - Anticancer Research

JF - Anticancer Research

SN - 0250-7005

IS - 9

ER -