Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels are associated with dyssomnia in females, but not males, among japanese workers

Reiko Nishich, Yu Nufuji, Masakazu Washio, Shuzo Kumagai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors that promote the growth and survival of neurons. Recent evidence suggests that BDNF is a sleep regulatory substance that contributes to sleep behavior. However, no studies have examined the association between the serum BDNF levels and dyssomnia. The present study was conducted to clarify the association between the serum BDNF levels and dyssomnia. Methods: A total of 344 workers (age: 40.1 ± 10.5 years, male: 204, female: 140) were included in the study. The serum BDNF levels were categorized into tertiles according to sex. Results: The prevalence of dyssomnia was 35.1% in males and 30.0% in females. In the females, the BDNF levels were found to be negatively associated with dyssomnia after adjusting for age, body mass index, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, depression, smoking, alcohol intake, and regular exercise. Compared with the females in the high BDNF group, the multivariate odds ratio (95% CI) of dyssomnia was 2.08 (0.62-6.98) in females in the moderate BDNF group and 8.41 (2.05-27.14) in females in the low BDNF group. No such relationships were found in the males. Conclusions: The serum BDNF levels are associated with dyssomnia in Japanese female, but not male, workers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)649-654
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 15 2013

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Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Serum
Sleep
Nerve Growth Factors
Dyslipidemias
Hyperglycemia
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Alcohols
Exercise
Depression
Hypertension
Neurons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels are associated with dyssomnia in females, but not males, among japanese workers. / Nishich, Reiko; Nufuji, Yu; Washio, Masakazu; Kumagai, Shuzo.

In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 7, 15.07.2013, p. 649-654.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Study Objectives: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors that promote the growth and survival of neurons. Recent evidence suggests that BDNF is a sleep regulatory substance that contributes to sleep behavior. However, no studies have examined the association between the serum BDNF levels and dyssomnia. The present study was conducted to clarify the association between the serum BDNF levels and dyssomnia. Methods: A total of 344 workers (age: 40.1 ± 10.5 years, male: 204, female: 140) were included in the study. The serum BDNF levels were categorized into tertiles according to sex. Results: The prevalence of dyssomnia was 35.1{\%} in males and 30.0{\%} in females. In the females, the BDNF levels were found to be negatively associated with dyssomnia after adjusting for age, body mass index, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, depression, smoking, alcohol intake, and regular exercise. Compared with the females in the high BDNF group, the multivariate odds ratio (95{\%} CI) of dyssomnia was 2.08 (0.62-6.98) in females in the moderate BDNF group and 8.41 (2.05-27.14) in females in the low BDNF group. No such relationships were found in the males. Conclusions: The serum BDNF levels are associated with dyssomnia in Japanese female, but not male, workers.",
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