Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels and the development of atrial fibrillation in a general japanese population - The hisayama study

Tomoko Yoshikawa, Jun Hata, Satoko Sakata, Takuya Nagata, Yoichiro Hirakawa, Yoshitaka Hirooka, Hiroyuki Tsutsui, Takanari Kitazono, Toshiharu Ninomiya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia in the elderly, and causes complications such as cardioembolic stroke. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, has been reported to be a risk factor for developing AF in Western countries. However, few community-based studies have examined this issue in general Asian populations. Methods and Results: A total of 2,510 community-dwelling Japanese participants aged ≥40 years without a history of AF were divided into 4 groups according to the sex-specific quartiles of serum hs-CRP concentrations (Q1, lowest and Q4, highest) and followed up for 24 years. The hazard ratios and their 95% confidence intervals for the development of AF were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. During the follow up, 234 subjects developed AF. The risk of AF increased significantly with elevating serum hs-CRP levels after adjustment for potential confounding factors (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], Q1, 1.00 [reference]; Q2, 1.26 [0.83.1.92]; Q3, 1.77 [1.18.2.66]; and Q4, 1.89 [1.24.2.86]; P for trend <0.001). Conclusions: The study findings suggest that elevated serum hs-CRP levels are an independent risk factor for the development of AF in a general Japanese population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1365-1372
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation Journal
Volume85
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels and the development of atrial fibrillation in a general japanese population - The hisayama study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this