Serum surfactant protein D is increased in acute and chronic inflammation in mice

Masaki Fujita, John M. Shannon, Hiroshi Ouchi, Dennis R. Voelker, Yoichi Nakanishi, Robert J. Mason

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Abstract

Surfactant protein A (SP-A) and surfactant protein D (SP-D) are important components of innate immunity that can modify the inflammatory response. However, alterations and regulation of SP-A and SP-D in acute and chronic inflammation are not well defined. In addition, serum SP-D may serve as a biomarker of lung inflammation. We determined the expression of SP-A and SP-D in murine models. To study acute inflammation, we instilled bleomycin intrabronchially. To study chronic lung inflammation, we used a transgenic mouse that overexpresses tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α under the control of the SP-C promoter. These mice have a chronic mononuclear cell infiltration, airspace enlargement, pulmonary hypertension, and focal pulmonary fibrosis. In acute inflammation model, levels of mRNA for all surfactant proteins were reduced after bleomycin administration. However, serum SP-D was increased from days 7 to 28 after instillation. In chronic inflammation model, SP-D mRNA expression was increased, whereas the expression of SP-A, SP-B and SP-C was reduced. Both serum and lung SP-D concentrations were increased in chronic lung inflammation. These data clarified profile of SP-A and SP-D in acute and chronic inflammation and indicated that serum SP-D can serve as a biomarker of lung inflammation in both acute and chronic lung injury in mice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-33
Number of pages9
JournalCytokine
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 7 2005

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Biochemistry
  • Hematology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Fujita, M., Shannon, J. M., Ouchi, H., Voelker, D. R., Nakanishi, Y., & Mason, R. J. (2005). Serum surfactant protein D is increased in acute and chronic inflammation in mice. Cytokine, 31(1), 25-33. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2005.02.006