Shape-engineered nanostructures for polarization control in optical near- and far-fields

M. Naruse, T. Yatsui, T. Kawazoe, H. Hori, Naoya Tate, M. Ohtsu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Light-matter interactions on the nanometer scale have been extensively studied to reveal their fundamental physical properties [1-3], as well as their impact on a wide range of applications, such as nanophotonic devicesnanophotonic devices [4], sensing [5], and characterization [6]. Fabrication technologies have also seen rapid progress, for example, in controlling the geometry of matter, such as its shape, position, and size [7,8], its quantum structure [9], and so forth. Electric-field enhancement based on the resonance between light and free electron plasma in metal is one well-known feature [10] that has already been used in many applications, such as optical data storage [11], bio-sensors [12], and integrated optical circuits [13-15]. Such resonance effects are, however, only one of the possible light-matter interactions on the nanometer scale that can be exploited for practical applications. For example, it is possible to engineer the polarization of light in the optical near-field and far-field by controlling the geometries of metal nanostructures, which also offer novel applications that are unachievable if based only on the nature of propagating light. It should be also noticed that since there is a vast number of design parameters potentially available on the nanometer scale, an intuitive physical picture of the polarization associated with geometries of nanostructures can be useful in restricting the parameters to obtain the intended optical responses.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Nano-Electro-Optics VII
Subtitle of host publicationChemical, Biological, and Nanophotonic Technologies for Nano-Optical Devices and Systems
EditorsMotoichi Ohtsu
Pages131-145
Number of pages15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 4 2010
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameSpringer Series in Optical Sciences
Volume155
ISSN (Print)0342-4111
ISSN (Electronic)1556-1534

Fingerprint

Nanostructures
Polarization
Geometry
Metals
Nanophotonics
Optical data storage
Physical properties
Electric fields
Plasmas
Engineers
Fabrication
Electrons
Networks (circuits)
Sensors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

Naruse, M., Yatsui, T., Kawazoe, T., Hori, H., Tate, N., & Ohtsu, M. (2010). Shape-engineered nanostructures for polarization control in optical near- and far-fields. In M. Ohtsu (Ed.), Progress in Nano-Electro-Optics VII: Chemical, Biological, and Nanophotonic Technologies for Nano-Optical Devices and Systems (pp. 131-145). (Springer Series in Optical Sciences; Vol. 155). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-03951-5_5

Shape-engineered nanostructures for polarization control in optical near- and far-fields. / Naruse, M.; Yatsui, T.; Kawazoe, T.; Hori, H.; Tate, Naoya; Ohtsu, M.

Progress in Nano-Electro-Optics VII: Chemical, Biological, and Nanophotonic Technologies for Nano-Optical Devices and Systems. ed. / Motoichi Ohtsu. 2010. p. 131-145 (Springer Series in Optical Sciences; Vol. 155).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Naruse, M, Yatsui, T, Kawazoe, T, Hori, H, Tate, N & Ohtsu, M 2010, Shape-engineered nanostructures for polarization control in optical near- and far-fields. in M Ohtsu (ed.), Progress in Nano-Electro-Optics VII: Chemical, Biological, and Nanophotonic Technologies for Nano-Optical Devices and Systems. Springer Series in Optical Sciences, vol. 155, pp. 131-145. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-03951-5_5
Naruse M, Yatsui T, Kawazoe T, Hori H, Tate N, Ohtsu M. Shape-engineered nanostructures for polarization control in optical near- and far-fields. In Ohtsu M, editor, Progress in Nano-Electro-Optics VII: Chemical, Biological, and Nanophotonic Technologies for Nano-Optical Devices and Systems. 2010. p. 131-145. (Springer Series in Optical Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-03951-5_5
Naruse, M. ; Yatsui, T. ; Kawazoe, T. ; Hori, H. ; Tate, Naoya ; Ohtsu, M. / Shape-engineered nanostructures for polarization control in optical near- and far-fields. Progress in Nano-Electro-Optics VII: Chemical, Biological, and Nanophotonic Technologies for Nano-Optical Devices and Systems. editor / Motoichi Ohtsu. 2010. pp. 131-145 (Springer Series in Optical Sciences).
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