SHED repair critical-size calvarial defects in mice

B. M. Seo, W. Sonoyama, Takayoshi Yamaza, C. Coppe, T. Kikuiri, K. Akiyama, J. S. Lee, S. Shi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

142 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) are a population of highly proliferative postnatal stem cells capable of differentiating into odontoblasts, adipocytes, neural cells, and osteo-inductive cells. To examine whether SHED-mediated bone regeneration can be utilized for therapeutic purposes, we used SHED to repair critical-size calvarial defects in immunocompromised mice. Materials and methods: We generated calvarial defects and transplanted SHED with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate as a carrier into the defect areas. Results: SHED were able to repair the defects with substantial bone formation. Interestingly, SHED-mediated osteogenesis failed to recruit hematopoietic marrow elements that are commonly seen in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-generated bone. Furthermore, SHED were found to co-express mesenchymal stem cell marker, CC9/MUC18/CD146, with an array of growth factor receptors such as transforming growth factor β receptor I and II, fibroblast growth factor receptor I and III, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor I, implying their comprehensive differentiation potential. Conclusions: Our data indicate that SHED, derived from neural crest cells, may select unique mechanisms to exert osteogenesis. SHED might be a suitable resource for orofacial bone regeneration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)428-434
Number of pages7
JournalOral Diseases
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Osteogenesis
Bone Regeneration
Growth Factor Receptors
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Stem Cells
Bone Marrow
Odontoblasts
Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor
Deciduous Tooth
Neural Crest
Transforming Growth Factors
Durapatite
Adipocytes
Bone and Bones
Population
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Seo, B. M., Sonoyama, W., Yamaza, T., Coppe, C., Kikuiri, T., Akiyama, K., ... Shi, S. (2008). SHED repair critical-size calvarial defects in mice. Oral Diseases, 14(5), 428-434. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1601-0825.2007.01396.x

SHED repair critical-size calvarial defects in mice. / Seo, B. M.; Sonoyama, W.; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Coppe, C.; Kikuiri, T.; Akiyama, K.; Lee, J. S.; Shi, S.

In: Oral Diseases, Vol. 14, No. 5, 01.07.2008, p. 428-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seo, BM, Sonoyama, W, Yamaza, T, Coppe, C, Kikuiri, T, Akiyama, K, Lee, JS & Shi, S 2008, 'SHED repair critical-size calvarial defects in mice', Oral Diseases, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 428-434. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1601-0825.2007.01396.x
Seo BM, Sonoyama W, Yamaza T, Coppe C, Kikuiri T, Akiyama K et al. SHED repair critical-size calvarial defects in mice. Oral Diseases. 2008 Jul 1;14(5):428-434. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1601-0825.2007.01396.x
Seo, B. M. ; Sonoyama, W. ; Yamaza, Takayoshi ; Coppe, C. ; Kikuiri, T. ; Akiyama, K. ; Lee, J. S. ; Shi, S. / SHED repair critical-size calvarial defects in mice. In: Oral Diseases. 2008 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 428-434.
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